Pojo's Yu-Gi-Oh! news, tips, strategies and more!



 


Card Game
Card of the Day
TCG Fan Tips
Top 10 Lists
Banned/Restricted List
Yu-Gi-Oh News
Tourney Reports
Duelist Interviews

Featured Writers
Baneful's Column
Anteaus on YGO
General Zorpa
Dark Paladin's Dimension
Retired Writers

Releases + Spoilers
Booster Sets (Original Series)
LOB | MRD | MRL | PSV
LON | LOD | PGD | MFC
DCR | IOC | AST | SOD
RDS | FET
Booster Sets (GX Series)
TLM | CRV | EEN | SOI
EOJ | POTD | CDIP | STON
FOTB | TAEV | GLAS | PTDN
LODT
Booster Sets (5D Series)
TDGS | CSOC | CRMS | RBGT
ANPR | SOVR | ABPF | TSHD
STBL | STOR | EXVC
Booster Sets (Zexal Series)
GENF | PHSW | ORCS | GAOV
REDU | ABYR | CBLZ | LTGY
NUMH | JOTL | SHSP | LVAL
PRIO

Starter Decks
Yugi | Kaiba
Joey | Pegasus
Yugi 2004 | Kaiba 2004
GX: 2006 | Jaden | Syrus
5D: 1 | 2 | Toolbox
Zexal: 2011 | 2012 | 2013
Yugi 2013 | Kaiba 2013

Structure Decks
Dragons Roar &
Zombie Madness
Blaze of Destruction &
Fury from the Deep
Warrior's Triumph
Spellcaster's Judgment
Lord of the Storm
Invincible Fortress
Dinosaurs Rage
Machine Revolt
Rise of Dragon Lords
Dark Emperor
Zombie World
Spellcaster Command
Warrior Strike
Machina Mayhem
Marik
Dragunity Legion
Lost Sanctuary
Underworld Gates
Samurai Warlord
Sea Emperor
Fire Kings
Saga of Blue-Eyes
Cyber Dragon

Promo Cards:
Promos Spoiler
Coll. Tins Spoiler
MP1 Spoiler
EP1 Spoiler

Tournament Packs:
TP1 / TP2 / TP3 / TP4
TP5 / TP6 / TP7 / TP8
Duelist Packs
Jaden | Chazz
Jaden #2 | Zane
Aster | Jaden #3
Jesse | Yusei
Yugi | Yusei #2
Kaiba | Yusei #3
Crow

Reprint Sets
Dark Beginnings
1 | 2
Dark Revelations
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
Gold Series
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
Dark Legends
DLG1
Retro Pack
1 | 2
Champion Pack
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
5 | 6 | 7 | 8
Turbo Pack
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
5 | 6 | 7

Hidden Arsenal:
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
5 | 6 | 7

Checklists
Brawlermatrix 08
Evan T 08
X-Ref List
X-Ref List w/ Passcodes

Anime
Episode Guide
Character Bios
GX Character Bios

Video Games
Millennium Duels (2014)
Nighmare Troubadour (2005)
Destiny Board Traveler (2004)
Power of Chaos (2004)
Worldwide Edition (2003)
Dungeon Dice Monsters (2003)
Falsebound Kingdom (2003)
Eternal Duelist Soul (2002)
Forbidden Memories (2002)
Dark Duel Stories (2002)

Other
About Yu-Gi-Oh
Yu-Gi-Oh! Timeline
Pojo's YuGiOh Books
Apprentice Stuff
Life Point Calculators
DDM Starter Spoiler
DDM Dragonflame Spoiler
The DungeonMaster
Millennium Board Game

Magic
DBZ
Pokemon
Yu Yu Hakusho
NeoPets
HeroClix
Harry Potter
Anime
Vs. System
Megaman

This Space
For Rent

Anteaus' History of Yu-Gi-Oh!
A (Re) Introduction
April 19, 2016

A long time ago I began writing about Yu-Gi-Oh! I was lucky enough to be published right here on Pojo, where you are likely reading this now. It’s been a long time. Back then, I was young, naive, full of thoughts and ideas that never really were as good as I thought they were. If you go back and read my work from years ago, you will probably see how terrible it really is! I had some good thoughts, but boy, that banlist I came up with...what was I thinking? 

In life, we learn. We are always learning, always seeing new things and changing our perspective. At one point I thought that I knew everything there is to know about this game. And, quite frankly, I was wrong. I admit it, and today I can safely say that I know a lot less about Yu-Gi-Oh! than I did even back then. I’ve played a lot of Yu-Gi-Oh! in my time, but nothing truly “competitive” in a long time. This is why I’ll probably be refraining from writing about the meta for the time being, at least until I’m able to catch back up with it. 

Instead, I’m debuting a new series - after quite a long absence, true - focusing on perhaps the most skillful format that we have ever seen: Goat Control Format, which I will mostly refer to as “Goat Format” simply because it’s what everyone knows it as. To be fair, there’s quite a bit out there already about Goat Format - this website has a good breakdown, and you can actually look at all the old Goat Format events here. Simply put, Goat Format follows the April 2005 banlist, has a more limited card pool (everything prior to the release of the booster set Cybernetic Revolution, in fact), but is widely considered to be the defining format in terms of skill. I actually wrote a bit about it myself - you can read all about it in my Looking at the Past article about it.  

At the time, the format was simply one of many that had come and gone. It didn’t even have a name - I called it the “Trinity Format” because that was something that defined the metagame at the time. The decks at the time, which you can read about in all those links above, focused on controlling the board with some variation of Scapegoat (where the format’s name comes from), Metamorphosis, Thousand-Eyes Restrict (which was recently released from the Forbidden List, much to the consternation of Goat players trying to get their hands on a playset), and Tsukuyomi.  

Field control by way of hand advantage was everything in the deck. It was a slower format, one that could see multiple back-to-back turns of “draw, set, pass” from both players. Resources were important, and hand size was a crucial part of the format. It made for slower, more methodical games, as players had to carefully consider the consequences of each card they played. Modern Goat Format has not lost that, and it’s quite a change from the fast-paced games of today, which I feel is why the format is gaining in popularity. 

The format has stayed the same for over a decade, with only minor variations. Because two booster sets and several promotional cards were released between April and October, 2005, many players have a hard time coming to a consensus about which cards are to be used - cards like Exarion Universe, Cyber Dragon and others saw their release at the end of the format, but only Exarion Universe is playable - the format does not include Cybernetic Revolution. The main reason for this is because Cyber Dragon, in many people’s eyes, changed the game so drastically that the entire format would be different if it were available. Exarion Universe, on the other hand, simply adds another dimension to the game, forcing players to be more careful with their Scapegoats, as it can deal piercing damage. 

I’m not looking to rehash the format, or to focus on the past. The format has changed a lot despite it being the same - with a decade of reflection, and with some players (notably Kris Perovic, a major Goat Format advocate and a respected voice of authority on it) continuing to play it, we’ve seen a number of strategies come to light that were rarely seen during its heyday. This has given rise to a thriving alternative to modern Yu-Gi-Oh! that results in satisfying games that can last upwards of an hour. 

The focus on my new Goat Format series is going to be how the format works today. There is no support from Konami for the format, sadly, which means that the community has to police itself. I highly recommend visiting the official Goat Format threat on the Pojo forums (you can find that here), as there is a lot of information from people who have dedicated time and effort to the format. As time goes on, I hope to discuss the changing nature of the format and expand a bit on the concepts that made the metagame what it was, alternative strategies, deck discussions and reviews, single-card analysis, and more. If you are interested in the format, make sure to bookmark the page and drop me a line on Twitter (@AnteausOnYGO) or through email at anteausonyugioh@gmail.com. 

Thanks,

Anteaus

 


 


Copyrightę 1998-2016 pojo.com
This site is not sponsored, endorsed, or otherwise affiliated with any of the companies or products featured on this site. This is not an Official Site.