'  

Home

Card Price Guide

MTG Fan Articles
Single Card Strategy 
Deck Tips & Strategies 
Tourney Reports 
Peasant Magic 
Featured Articles

Featured Writers
The Dragon's Den
Rumblings From The Ass
The Heretic's Sermon
Through The Portal

Deck Garage
Aaron's School

Community
Message Board 
Chat
Magic League

Contact Us

Pojo's Book Reviews

Links

 


Pojo's Magic The Gathering
Judge's Corner

COPs, Spiritmonger, and You

One quick note before I get started I've received a few emails with no body and an attachment. I deleted them right away, as I will with any attachment. If you want to ask a question, please put it in the body of the email, not as an attachment. Thanks.

Now, on to the questions

---

Q: I have a Spiritmonger and my opponent has a CoP: Black. He has no blockers and I am attacking with the Spiritmonger. If I use a green mana to change Spiritmonger's color before the attack phase, can he use his CoP to prevent damage from my Spiritmonger? Or does the color change make the Spiritmonger an illegal target?

-Ben

A: If the Spiritmonger isn't the appropriate color (in this case, black) when he deals his damage, then the damage won't be prevented. Note though, the prevention shield won't be used up. So if the Spiritmonger happens to turn black and damage you again later in the turn, the previous activation of the CoP: Black will prevent the damage.

419.7c Some abilities that generate prevention effects can affect damage only from a source with certain characteristics, such as a creature or a source of a particular color. When prevention "shields" with these types of restrictions are used, they recheck the source from which they're preventing damage. If the characteristics no longer match, the damage isn't prevented.

---

Q: What is sideboarding?

A: Sideboarding is a process that happens in a tournament. First, I have to define the term sideboard. A sideboard is different if you are playing a constructed tournament (where you bring a deck to the tournament) or a limited tournament (where you receive the cards you play with at the tournament).

For constructed tournaments, if you have a sideboard, it must be exactly 15 cards.

For limited tournaments, any cards that you do not play in your main deck are your sideboard.

The purpose of the sideboard is to be able to strengthen your deck against other specific decks. After the first game of a match, you can swap cards from your main deck and sideboard, with the following limitations:

Constructed: You must swap cards on a one for one basis. This means the number of cards in your sideboard will always be 15.

Limited: You can take any number of cards out and put any number of cards in, as long as the number of cards in your main deck remains 40 or greater. The number of cards you put in need not equal the number of cards you take out all that matters is that you have 40 cards in your main deck when you start the next game.

After the match, you must reset your deck to the way it was before it started for the next match.

---

Q: What are "limited" and "unlimited"? I just want to know because I read your stuff all the time, but I'm not familiar with some terms.

A: "Limited" is a type of tournament Magic where you play with the cards you receive at the tournament.

I've searched through my archives, and can't find the term "unlimited" used outside of its normal English context.

---

Q: Can I regenerate a creature I sacrifice?

A: No.

---

Q: If I have an enchantment on a creature that gives it a regenerate ability e.g. Keldon Mantle, does the enchantment dissolve when I use the regenerate ability?

-Tomjoad13

A: No. The definition of regeneration is "The next time [permanent] would be destroyed this turn, instead remove all damage from it, tap it, and (if it's in combat) remove it from combat." (419.6b)

---

Q: If someone uses Elvish Lyrist's ability to pay one green, tap it, and sac it, to destroy an enchantment, on my Opposition. Can I in response use my Opposition to tap a creature to tap the Lyrist so that he can't play the ability?

A: The Lyrist isn't there anymore, so you can't tap it.

---

Q: Say I burn it with a Shock? Same thing?

A: Same thing.

---

Q: And if I tap the Lyrist first, can my opponent still use the Lyrist's ability to destroy my Opposition?

-will chen

A: Yes.

---

Q: Hi. I am a beginner at Magic. I play with my friends during lunchtime. Needless to say, however, I usually end up being mocked and/or made fun of by my friends and thus I have started to dislike the game. Actually, I love the game, but rather I hate not understanding some parts. My friends tried to explain; yet I continue to be perplexed. I just don't understand the power and toughness. I never know when someone else's creature could kill me and I end up losing my creatures.

A: First, let's explain the power and toughness thing for you.

There are two numbers (usually printed) on the bottom left corner of a card, separated by a slash ("/"). The first number is what we call the creature's power. That number is how much damage the creature will do in combat. The second number is what we call the creature's toughness. This is how much damage it will take to kill the creature. That damage has to be done all in one turn, since creatures heal at the end of every turn.

(If the creature isn't a card, the creature's power and toughness can be found by the spell or ability that made the creature. Again, look for the slash ["/"].)

Now let's go on to your examples, one by one. For purposes of simplification, I will call the First creature in each example "Creature A," and the second creature in each example will be "Creature B."

---

Q: For example, please tell what will happen in the following situations in terms of who would die and who would not:

(Assuming that none have first strike, flying, protection from..., or ...walk, etc.)

A: (So they're what we call "vanilla creatures." I'll also assume that nothing makes the creatures bigger/smaller before they deal damage.)

---

1. A 4/5 creature attacks and is blocked by a 5/4 creature

A: Creature A (that's the 4/5 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 5/4 creature) has a power of 5. That means it does 5 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 5. That means it takes 5 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 4. That means it takes 4 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 4 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 5 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 5 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature A dies.
Creature B now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature B dies.

End result: Both creatures die.

---

2. A 4/4 creature attacks and is blocked by a 5/4 creature.

A: Creature A (that's the 4/4 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 5/4 creature) has a power of 5. That means it does 5 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 4. That means it takes 4 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 4. That means it takes 4 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 4 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 5 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 5 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature A dies.
Creature B now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature B dies.

End result: Both creatures die.

---

3. A 4/3 creature attacks and is blocked by a 5/4 creature.

A: Creature A (that's the 4/3 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 5/4 creature) has a power of 5. That means it does 5 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 3. That means it takes 3 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 4. That means it takes 4 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 4 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 5 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 5 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature A dies.
Creature B now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature B dies.

End result: Both creatures die.

---

4. A 4/5 creature attacks and is blocked by a 4/5 creature.

A: Creature A (that's the 4/5 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 4/5 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 5. That means it takes 5 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 5. That means it takes 5 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 4 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 4 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is less than its toughness, Creature A survives.
Creature B now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is less than its toughness, Creature B survives.

End result: Both creatures survive.

---

5. A 4/4 creature attacks and is blocked by a 4/5 creature.

A: Creature A (that's the 4/4 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 4/5 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 4. That means it takes 4 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 5. That means it takes 5 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 4 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 4 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature A dies.
Creature B now has 5 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is less than its toughness, Creature B survives.

End result: Creature A dies, Creature B survives.

---

6. A 4/3 creature attacks and is blocked by a 4/5 creature.

A: Creature A (that's the 4/3 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 4/5 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 3. That means it takes 3 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 5. That means it takes 5 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 4 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 4 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature A dies.
Creature B now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is less than its toughness, Creature B survives.

End result: Creature A dies, Creature B survives.

---

7. A 5/4 creature attacks and is blocked by a 4/5 creature.

A: Creature A (that's the 5/4 creature) has a power of 5. That means it does 5 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 4/5 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 4. That means it takes 4 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 5. That means it takes 5 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 5 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 4 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature A dies.
Creature B now has 5 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature B dies.

End result: Both creatures die.

---

8. A 6/4 creature attacks and is blocked by a 5/6 creature.

A: Creature A (that's the 6/4 creature) has a power of 6. That means it does 6 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 5/6 creature) has a power of 5. That means it does 5 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 4. That means it takes 4 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 6. That means it takes 6 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 6 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 5 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 5 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature A dies.
Creature B now has 6 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature B dies.

End result: Both creatures die.

---

9. A 5/6 creature attacks and is blocked by a 6/4 creature.

A: Creature A (that's the 5/6 creature) has a power of 5. That means it does 5 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 6/4 creature) has a power of 6. That means it does 6 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 6. That means it takes 6 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 4. That means it takes 4 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 5 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 6 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 6 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature A dies.
Creature B now has 5 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is equal to or greater than its toughness, Creature B dies.

End result: Both creatures die.

---

10. A 3/4 creature attacks and is blocked by a 0/7 wall.

A: Creature A (that's the 3/4 creature) has a power of 3. That means it does 3 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 0/7 wall) has a power of 0. That means it does 0 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 4. That means it takes 4 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 7. That means it takes 7 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 3 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 0 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 0 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is less than its toughness, Creature A survives.
Creature B now has 3 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is less than its toughness, Creature B survives.

End result: Both creatures survive.

---

11. A 2/5 creature attacks and is blocked by a 4/5 creature.

A: Creature A (that's the 2/5 creature) has a power of 2. That means it does 2 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 4/5 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 5. That means it takes 5 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 5. That means it takes 5 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 2 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 4 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is less than its toughness, Creature A survives.
Creature B now has 2 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is less than its toughness, Creature B survives.

End result: Both creatures survive.

---

12. A 4/5 creature attacks and is blocked by a 2/5 creature.

-Card1515

A: Creature A (that's the 4/5 creature) has a power of 4. That means it does 4 damage in combat.
Creature B (the 2/5 creature) has a power of 2. That means it does 2 damage in combat.

Creature A has a toughness of 5. That means it takes 5 damage in one turn to kill it.
Creature B has a toughness of 5. That means it takes 5 damage in one turn to kill it.

Creature A does 4 damage to Creature B, and Creature B does 2 damage to creature A.

Creature A now has 2 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is less than its toughness, Creature A survives.
Creature B now has 4 damage on it. Since the amount of damage it has taken this turn is less than its toughness, Creature B survives.

End result: Both creatures survive.

Hope this helps!!

-Bill Guerin
PojoMagicJudge@hotmail.com
DCI Level 2 Judge

 

 

Pojo.com

Copyright 2001 Pojo.com

   

Magic the Gathering is a Registered Trademark of Wizards of the Coast.
This site is not affiliated with Wizards of the Coast and is not an Official Site.