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Jeff Zandi is a six time pro tour veteran who has been playing Magic since 1994. Jeff is a level two DCI judge and has been judging everything from small local tournaments to pro tour events. Jeff is from Coppell, Texas, a suburb of Dallas, where his upstairs game room has been the "Guildhall", the home of the Texas Guildmages, since the team formed in 1996. One of the original founders of the team, Jeff Zandi is the team's administrator, and is proud to continue the team's tradition of having players in every pro tour from the first event in 1996 to the present.

 

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This Space For Rent

The Southwestern Paladin
Time Spiral DC-10 Showdown
by Jeff Zandi
October 16, 2006

DC-10 is not considered an important Magic format, to say the least. The few people that have ever played, or even heard of, DC-10 regard it simply as a way to kill a little time and an excuse to rip a few packs. In this article, I have detailed the play of sixteen Time Spiral booster packs against each other in a randomly seeded single elimination bracket. Preparing and playing this sixteen pack DC-10 “tournament” I think I actually did gain some insight about Time Spiral cards. DC-10 is good in that it makes you look at Magic cards differently, and the more different ways you can strategically consider the cards in Magic, the more you can learn about them. DC-10 is a format where certain kinds of cards become much better than they would be in any other format. Namely, cards that need a lot of mana to be useful. After testing these sixteen booster packs against each other in this DC-10 showdown, I learned, for instance, that Ghitu Firebreathing COULD actually be very useful. I had not even remotely considered playing Ghitu Firebreathing before I took part in this DC-10 exercise. Now I have included this card in a Time Spiral booster draft deck and learned that, although its usefulness is pretty narrow, there is a time and a place in limited play for Ghitu Firebreathing. You can always learn new things when you try new things.

 

HOW TO PLAY DC-10

 

DC-10 works like this: each player opens a single booster pack and shuffles the cards in that pack as much as possible, without looking at the cards in their pack. The players determine, in some way, who will play first. Players begin the game with no cards in their hand. Players draw one card per turn, as normal, but each player is assumed to have a certain amount of mana producing lands already in play for them to use.

 

In my own particular house rules for DC-10, each player is said to have 100 of each basic land type in play on their side at the beginning of the game. These lands are real Swamps, Islands, etcetera for all game purposes, such as land walk or other specific abilities. These lands can be sacrificed, destroyed or even returned to a player’s hand just as though they were actual lands. In other words, if your opponent played Flashfires, all Plains would be destroyed and neither player would have any more Plains with which to play white cards for the remainder of the game. The game ends when one player wins the game according to normal Magic rules. Very often, a player wins a game of DC-10 because his opponent draws his entire fifteen card library and then loses because he has no more cards to draw. Some players contend that so-called “blank” cards in your pack can be discarded to draw another card. These cards are called blanks because they have virtually no possible effect on the game, like the foil basic lands that can appear in Time Spiral packs. Under my own house rules, however, there is no such provision for handling undesirable cards in your pack. If you draw a card that is not particularly useful in DC-10, like a land or mana producing artifact, that’s just a bit of bad luck that is completely balanced by the cards whose power level is significantly higher in DC-10 compared to other formats.

 

For DC-10 using Time Spiral, I have not found a degenerative enough combo that needs to be banned or restricted in any way. DC-10 is a highly unpredictable format, with some games over on game one when someone draws a Disintegrate to games in which both players draw all fifteen of the cards in their pack.

 

The purpose of this so-called Time Spiral DC-10 Showdown is simply to enjoy watching these new cards interact with each other under somewhat realistic game conditions. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed creating this mammoth article.

 

HISTORY OF DC-10

 

To the best of my recollection, it was about four years ago that a group of Magic pros were on their way to some distant tournament when one of them had the bright idea to pop open a couple of booster packs and try to play a game using the extremely limited space available in the coach section of a jam-packed DC-10 commercial jetliner.

 

A DIFFERENT KIND OF TIME SPIRAL CARD REVIEW

 

EVERYONE and their mother is reviewing Time Spiral cards these days, but I am proud to present my review of some of the new cards in a totally different context than other reviewers. The cards reviewed below were all a part of my Time Spiral DC-10 Showdown. They are not necessarily the most important cards in Time Spiral for either limited or constructed play, just cards that I found interesting during this exercise. Later in this article you can see the actual play-by-play of the DC-10 battles between the sixteen booster packs that I opened. You will see how some cards that don’t seem that great can be simply dominant in DC-10. I would have reviewed more cards in this article, but as you can see, the article is WAY TOO LONG already.

 

In the following card reviews, I have included a numeric review based on the familiar Pojo 1-5 scale where a ‘1’ is the worst, ‘3’ is average and ‘5’ is a top-notch must-play. Each card below is measured in three play formats: limited, constructed and, of course, DC-10.

 

REVIEWS OF SOME COMMONS USED IN THIS TOURNAMENT

 

Fathom Seer is a 1/3 Illusion for 1U that morphs for the cost of returning two islands back to your hand. When Fathom Seer is turned face up, you draw two cards. I wasn’t thrilled, at first, about returning lands to my hand, but drawing cards is so important in limited play that I am regularly including up to two of these guys in my draft decks. Not likely to make much of a splash in constructed, not because of his morph cost but because of the cost of putting him into play tapped. These days, blue mages have better ways to get cards in constructed decks than Fathom Seer. In DC-10, Fathom Seer is a great bargain because you only have fifteen cards in your deck and the Seer gives you easy access to TWO MORE of them.

LIMITED: 3.0

CONSTRUCTED: 2.0

DC-10: 3.5

 

Gaze of Justice is a one white mana cost sorcery that removes a target creature from the game. Sounds pretty phenomenal… but wait, there’s more, as an additional cost to play Gaze of Justice you must tap three untapped white creatures. Gaze of Justice also has flashback with a cost of 5W. So is this a terrible spell or a great one? It’s both. In constructed, it might not be too bad from the sideboard, giving a white weenie deck serious targeted creature removal. In limited play, Gaze of Justice and also be good, as long as you understand what you need in order to play it effectively. What you need, quite simply, is lots of white creatures. As a matter of fact, you probably need MOST of the creatures in your sealed or draft deck to be white in order to make Gaze of Justice effective. Once you manage to have enough white creatures in your deck, Gaze of Justice is a great card. In Time Spiral draft, you should be able to get at least two of these cards and you will certainly want to play up to three copies IF you can manage to have at least eight or nine white creatures in a deck with LOTS of creatures in it.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.0

DC-10: 1.0

 

Ghitu Firebreathing is a creature enchantment (aura) for 1R that can be played as an instant (flash) and which gives the enchanted creature two abilities. For one red mana, you can either give enchanted creature +1/+0 until end of turn or you can return Ghitu Firebreathing to its owner’s hand. Cards like this have been around in Magic for a very long time, starting with the original Firebreathing from the original base set. Enchantments like this have basically been ignored by serious players for most of their history for two reasons, first that Firebreathing (or its ilk) is the waste of a card in their deck and two, that a card like this is wasted when it is played on a creature only to have that creature destroyed, bounced or otherwise removed from play before the creature enchantment even has a chance to resolve. Ghitu Firebreathing can’t do much to convince players against the FIRST argument, but has two things working for it that make it much less risky to play. Ghitu Firebreathing can be played as an instant, making it easy to play it at a time when your opponent is unlikely to be able to respond by removing the creature you wish to enchant. Secondly, this aura can be returned to your hand at any time for just one red mana. Until running across the card playing DC-10 for this article, I had not seriously considered EVER playing Ghitu Firebreathing. In DC-10, of course, this card was THE BOMB, allowing you to just play it as an instant and WIN anytime one of my creatures went unblocked by the opponent. Learning how good this card was in the wacky DC-10 format helped me realize what Ghitu Firebreathing REALLY is, it’s a reusable instant speed spell that essentially allows you to give a creature +X/+0 where X is the amount of red mana you feel like spending. The original give-a-creature-plus-X-plus-O instant was Howl from Beyond. More recently, this type of instant has become a red card, like Balduvian Rage from Coldsnap. While probably never destined for success in constructed, Ghitu Firebreathing has a place in red limited decks that have LOTS of mountains.

LIMITED: 3.0

CONSTRUCTED: 1.5

DC-10: 4.5

 

Grapeshot is a sorcery for 1R that deals one point to target creature or player and which has Storm. In constructed play, this card has already been discussed as a win condition card for combo decks that use a loop of replayed cards to create mana, or, in the case of Grapeshot, a lot of spells cast during the turn allowing Grapeshot to put a huge number of Storm copies on the stack, each of which can be targeted separately. Outside of mad combos, I don’t think Grapeshot will be very interesting in constructed. In Time Spiral limited, Grapeshot is good enough even without the Storm ability since there are so many one toughness creatures that are played in the format. With a little care, it is easily possible to get one or two spells played during your turn before you play Grapeshot to deal two or three (or even more) points of damage divided among any number of targets.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 2.0

DC-10: 3.0

 

Looter il-Kor is a 1/1 Kor Rogue with Shadow for 1U. When Looter il-Kor deals damage to an opponent, you draw a card and then discard a card. In limited, Looter il-Kor is one hard-working little guy! You might want two of these in your draft deck if blue is in your plans. There aren’t really that many creatures with shadow in Time Spiral, so Looter gets in there turn after turn, improving your hand every time. Is there any call for a constructed shadow deck? If there is, Looter il-Kor might be able to make the cut, but chances are this greedy little nibbler is destined to be much more valuable in limited than in constructed. In DC-10, this guy is amazing if your pack has a game-winning bomb in it somewhere.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 2.5

DC-10: 4.0

 

Mindstab is a sorcery for 5B that makes a target player discard three cards. Mindstab has Suspend 4 and a Suspend cost of one black mana. In limited (and possibly constructed) there is nothing wrong with suspending Mindstab on turn one. In limited, even though your opponent can see the handwriting on the wall (that he is about to lose his hand in a few turns), he will have some difficulty using up his entire hand in the short number of turns before Mindstab runs out of time counters and is played for no cost. Later in games, drawing Mindstab might not be too bad, when you can afford to pay six mana, it should be worth basically trading your own turn (what else would you be able to do on your turn if you are spending six mana playing Mindstab?) to peel three cards from your opponent’s hand. The problem I have with this card is what to do with it when you draw it on turns two through five or six? It feels awkward to suspend this spell when your opponent only has one or two cards in hand, and it feels equally unpleasant to have Mindstab stuck in your hand without being able to cast it. Good players are telling me to play one in booster drafts, but I have to say that I think the jury is definitely still out on this card.

LIMITED: 3.0

CONSTRUCTED: 2.0

DC-10: 3.0

 

Momentary Blink is an instant for 1W that removes a target creature from the game and then returns that creature to play. Momentary Blink can also has Flashback with a cost of 3U. Remember Otherworldly Journey from Champions of Kamigawa? Momentary Blink has most of the same functionality. If Momentary Blink is as good as Otherworldly Journey it should see plenty of play in constructed. In Time Spiral limited, Momentary Blink is great in all kinds of situations, particularly when you use it on a creature with a beneficial coming to play ability. Momentary Blink allows your creature to sidestep virtually all kinds of removal effects from your opponent. If your opponent targets your creature with a Rift Bolt, for example, you simply respond with Momentary Blink and your creature is removed from play and then returned to play where it is NO LONGER THE SAME CREATURE that was targeted by the Rift Bolt, causing the Rift Bolt to be countered with no legal target. Momentary Blink can be used similarly against just about any targeted removal effect, although the old Otherworldly Journey WOULD be preferable when your opponent is playing a global kill spell like Wrath of God.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.0

DC-10: 3.5

 

Scarwood Treefolk is a 3/5 Treefolk for 3G that comes into play tapped. This uncomplicated creature is entirely decent for limited play. The downside of coming into play tapped is easily overshadowed by this creature’s 3/5 body for just four mana. I like this card more than if it were the same size for five mana and didn’t come into play tapped. The four casting spot is a jam-packed part of a lot of sealed and booster draft decks in Time Spiral limited formats, but Scarwood Treefolk should easily fit in most cases. Not much chance for this guy in constructed, I fear, a format where even the return of Ernham Djinn several years ago was met with yawns.

LIMITED: 3.0

CONSTRUCTED: 1.5

DC-10: 3.0

 

Tendrils of Corruption is an instant for 3B that deals X to a target creature and gains for you X life where X is the number of Swamps you have in play. If this card was capable of targeting players, it would certainly have a place in constructed play. As it is, Tendrils of Corruption is probably destined only for limited play. Having played with this card in booster drafts for two weeks now, I am still seeing good players surprised to see Tendrils blowing up their creatures and gaining lots of life for me, all at instant speed. To make this card really good in your booster draft decks, try to make black your primary color, it will obviously make this card better if you have eight, nine or even ten Swamps in your deck. In the version of DC-10 that I used for this Time Spiral DC-10 Showdown, each player has 100 of each basic land type in play on their side starting at the beginning of each game. In this version of DC-10, resolving Tendrils of Corruption virtually makes it impossible for your opponent to defeat you with damage.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 2.5

DC-10: 4.0

 

Trespasser il-Vec is a 3/1 Human Rogue for 2B. You can discard a card to give the Trespasser shadow until end of turn. In limited, three mana for a 3/1 creature is reasonable enough. When you add the ability to block a shadow creature or, better yet, to avoid your opponent’s blockers by gaining shadow, Trespasser il-Vec becomes a common creature with lots of potential in limited games.

LIMITED: 3.0

CONSTRUCTED: 2.0

DC-10: 3.0

 

REVIEWS OF SOME UNCOMMONS USED IN THIS TOURNAMENT

 

Celestial Crusader is a 2/2 Spirit for 2WW. This card has the Flash ability, so it can be played anytime you could play an instant and Split Second, meaning that when you play it, this spell cannot be responded to with spells or non-mana activated abilities or anything else that uses the stack. Furthermore, this creature has flying and gives all OTHER white creatures +1/+1. That’s a lot of text on one Magic card, but don’t let it stop you from making the most of this hot little number. Actually, the only number that isn’t HOT on the Celestial Crusader is four, the amount of mana it takes to play it. With a casting cost of 1WW this might have been a powerful card for constructed. As it is, it’s a very good card for white booster draft decks. When you draft white in Time Spiral booster drafts, you pretty much want to suck up all the white cards that you can because the white Time Spiral draft decks seem to get much better the closer to mono white that they become. This card reinforces that strategy in a couple of ways. First, this card’s double white mana cost more or less means that your deck must be primarily white for this card to be easy to cast on turn four or five. Secondly, the more white creatures that you suck up for your deck, the fewer white creatures than will be in anyone else’s deck, helping to ensure that Celestial Crusader’s +1/+1 “Crusade” functionality will be useful only to you and not your opponent. Flash and Split Second combine to make Celestial Crusader a powerful combat trick.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.0

DC-10: 3.0

 

Clockwork Hydra is a 0/0 Hydra artifact creature for five colorless mana that comes into play with four +1/+1 counters on it. You can tap this creature to add a +1/+1 counter to it. Whenever Clockwork Hydra attacks or blocks, you must remove a +1/+1 counter from the Hydra. When you do, you get to do a point of damage to a creature or player. On the surface, the Clockwork Hydra looks like a lot of his clockwork family tree from the past, and possibly a little more trouble than its worth. Actually, in limited, Clockwork Hydra is quite useful. The ability to deal a point of damage to any target at the very moment that it is declared an attacker or blocker is very useful in Time Spiral limited formats. There are a number of one toughness creatures in the format that simply won’t be in play very long once the Hydra is in play. Better yet, your Clockwork Hydra in play can even force your opponent from being able to play his one toughness creatures, and may slow his game strategy down in other ways since he may not want to attack with a ground creature. If your opponent doesn’t attack right away and you are not needing to attack with the Hydra, you can tap him at the end of your opponent’s turn to give the Hydra another counter, making him more dangerous and more difficult to handle with each passing turn.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 2.5

DC-10: 4.0

 

Conflagrate is a sorcery for XXR that deals X damage divided any way you want among any number of creatures and players. Conflagrate also has Flashback for a cost of RR and the discard of X cards from your hand. This card has taken me on a bit of a roller coaster ride as I have tried to use it in Time Spiral sealed deck and booster draft formats. First, I wanted to think of it as a flat-out bonafide fireball. It isn’t. The casting requirements for Conflagrate make it difficult to use for anything but expensive removal for a one toughness creature or possibly REALLY EXPENSIVE removal for a two toughness creature. Then, just as I was about to give up on Conflagrate, I figured out that it was ALMOST as useful as a typical red X spell in many cases. In the early game, you just have to suck it up and give up your Conflagrate to get rid of a troublesome 1/1 sometimes, or else to deal a final point of damage to a larger creature after it has taken some damage in combat perhaps. Late in the game, with nine mana in play, Conflagrate is the four point direct damage spell that you may very well need to finish off your opponent. After Conflagrate is in your graveyard, don’t forget about it, you can now hold onto lands and possibly other cards that you draw that are not important to your game anymore, now you can flash back Conflagrate from the graveyard to finish off your opponent or to destroy an annoying creature. Once you consider the various ways you can make this card useful to your draft or sealed deck, you will probably want to include one Conflagrate in your limited decks even though it doesn’t quite hit as hard as quick as a Fireball or a Disintegrate. Of course, this card almost single handedly breaks the DC-10 format, the same as other X spells have done in the past.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 2.0

DC-10: 5.0

 

Evil Eye of Urborg is a 6/3 Eye for 4B. Like its older brother Evil Eye of Orms-by-Gore, Evil Eye of Urborg has the limitation that when it is in play, only creatures with the creature type “Eye” can attack. Evil Eye of Urborg trumps its old brother, however, because it hits for six a turn and is nearly impossible to block effectively, because THIS Evil Eye destroys any creature that tries to block it. Of course, your opponent can poke YOU in the eye if he manages to neutralize your Evil Eye without killing it. He might do this by playing an enchantment like Temporal Isolation or by having some sort of mechanism in place creating an endless supply of chump blockers for your Eye. These threats aside, Evil Eye of Urborg is more often a very problematic card for your opponent in Time Spiral limited games, where he has very little time to find answers for this tricky little creature. If I were you, I’d keep an eye on it.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.0

DC-10: 4.0

 

Firemaw Kavu is a 4/2 Kavu for 5R that deals two damage to a target creature when it comes into play and deals four damage to a target creature when it leaves play. This creature also has Echo. Echo is actually one of the better things about this creature in limited play situations. There are many times in sealed deck and booster draft games when all you want to do is play this Kavu, hopefully killing a troublesome creature on the other side of the board, a creature you may have NO INTENTION at all of paying the echo costs for. Just as importantly, this is a 4/2 creature that deals an extra four points of damage to a creature when it goes to the graveyard. Very possibly, a creature that attacked you and was blocked by the Kavu. Firemaw Kavu is like a number of new cards in Time Spiral that are newer versions of very powerful old cards, this one recalls Flametongue Kavu, of course. The Time Spiral versions, however, have been carefully crafted to give ALMOST as much playability to limited games as the original creature without creating a problem for constructed play for years to come. In other words, Firemaw Kavu is ALMOST as good as Flametongue Kavu in limited games, but is NOWHERE NEAR as good as old “FTK” in constructed. Flametongue Kavu, as the computer gaming kids say, has been effectively “nerfed”.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 2.0

DC-10: 3.5

 

Fledgling Mawcor is a 2/2 flying Beast for 3U that taps to deal one point of damage to a target creature or player. This creature also has a Morph cost of two blue mana. For a cost just one colorless more than the old Prodigal Sorcerer, you get a perfectly good pinger that is 2/2 instead of a 1/1 that ALSO flies. Morph is an interesting ability for this card, giving it the advantage of surprise that is pretty rare for pinging creatures.

LIMITED: 4.0

CONSTRUCTED: 3.0

DC-10: 3.5

 

Knight of the Holy Nimbus is a 2/2 Human Rebel Knight with Flanking for two white mana. This creature also regenerates automatically for no cost if it is destroyed, although an opponent can activate a two colorless mana ability of this card to not allow it to be regenerated until end of turn. This card moves right into constructed white weenie decks. The free regeneration comes into play more often than you would think. You would think it would be easy for your opponent to have two mana available to stop the Knight’s regeneration ability, he very often does not. Of course, the regeneration ability is just a small part of this card’s appeal. This card is also a Rebel, searchable with all your old Rebel searchers in your Magic collection as well as the two casting cost Amrou Scout from this set! Try to remember that underneath all these other features is a highly efficient 2/2 flanker.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.5

DC-10: 3.0

 

Phyrexian Totem is an artifact for three colorless mana that taps to produce one black mana. In addition, the Totem can be turned into a 5/5 black Horror artifact creature with trample until end of turn for the cost of 2B. Whenever Phyrexian Totem is dealt damage, if it’s a creature, you must sacrifice that number of permanents. First of all, in limited, you will be thrilled to have this card in your deck just for the ability to improve your deck’s mana production. If your opponent is a little slow getting their game going against you, they may find that you play the Phyrexian Totem on turn three and then activate and send him right in on turn four to deal five damage to them (if they don’t have any blockers). Usually, the Totem does not attack until you are reasonably sure it won’t be blocked or take any damage. The later the game gets, however, the more willing you will be to send in your 5/5 artifact creature to trample over the last points of damage on your way to victory. At earlier points in the game, don’t be afraid to get the Phyrexian Totem in there even if it might cost you one or two permanents. It may often be worth it in the long run to be slightly aggressive with Phyrexian Totem. This card is great in limited and may even have a future in black control decks. In DC-10, you have plenty of mana always available to activate this monster and lots of spare lands to sacrifice as well, making the Totem the perfect smashing machine.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.5

DC-10: 4.5

 

Saltcrusted Steppe is one of the five new allied colored uncommon storage lands found in Time Spiral. These lands are greatly improved from storage lands of the past. For one, you can tap Saltcrusted Steppe (and its four other Time Spiral siblings) for colorless mana. If you spend a mana and tap this storage land, you can put a storage counter on the land. For one colorless mana, you can remove any number of storage counters from Saltcrusted Steppe adding that number, in any combination, of white and/or green mana. You can actually remove storage counters from these lands while they are tapped, and you can also draw your stored mana out of these lands without the use of any other land because you can tap Saltcrusted Steppe for colorless mana to activate its ability to remove storage counters from Saltcrusted Steppe. That’s a mouthful, but suffice it to say that these new storage lands are very playable for limited, though not quite as delicious perhaps as the Karoo lands from the Ravnica block. For this reason, Ravnica’s Karoo lands will probably keep these new lands on the bench where constructed Magic is concerned. I would have to say that unless your deck can really take advantage of a large amount of stored mana, I would only be interested in using Saltcrusted Steppe or its brethren only when my deck had a use for both colors that the land creates.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.0

DC-10: 0.0

 

Skittering Monstrosity is a 5/5 Horror for 3BB that you must sacrifice when you play a creature spell. Okay… and I would really need to play another creature with this guy in play because…? In limited, Skittering Monstrosity will probably not be the first creature you cast. Once this fattie is in play, I see no reason to WANT to play another creature until your opponent finds a way to deal with THIS one. In constructed, Skittering Monstrosity might fill the bill for a big monster in a mono black control deck that wants to play just a couple of creatures for a win condition. In the big picture, there is no doubt that this card’s play restriction DOES matter, but most of the time, you will be more than happy with this creature in play on your side of the board.

LIMTED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.5

DC-10: 4.0

 

REVIEWS OF THE TIME SPIRAL RARES USED IN THIS TOURNAMENT

 

Candles of Leng is a two casting cost artifact. When you tap the Candles of Leng and pay four colorless mana, reveal the top card of your library, if it has the same name as a card in your graveyard, put it into your graveyard. Otherwise, draw a card. This card is basically a Jayemdae Tome that you can cast on turn two or three. In limited, this card will provide roughly the same card advantage that Jayemdae Tome would, although you will be pretty unhappy on those occasions when you would LIKE to draw the card that happens to have the same name as a card in your graveyard. This is another example of a card in Time Spiral being FIXED to make it just as good as an old card (Jayemdae Tome) in limited but not nearly as good as the original card in constructed. In constructed, where you are very likely playing four copies of each important card in your deck, Candles of Leng would be much less useful. Seeing as how Jayemdae Tome is not exactly popular among the ranks of serious constructed players, there was really no reason for Candles of Leng to be made WORSE than Jayemdae Tome. I suppose there is the chance that you can put some of your land into your graveyard (by discarding to something, maybe) and then you can use Candles to help you navigate past the other land cards in your library to help you find more useful cards.

LIMITED: 4.0

CONSTRUCTED: 2.5

DC-10: 4.5

 

Curse of the Cabal is a sorcery for 9B that causes a target player to sacrifice half the permanents he or she controls, rounded down. This card also has Suspend 2 and a Suspend cost of 2BB. My first impression was that this card was by no means worth the effort. First of all, it seems impossible to play unless you plan on suspending it. After watching someone else wreck their opponent with it, I have to say that in limited at least, this card is worth playing. Starting its time in suspense with only two time counters, and costing only four mana to suspend, Curse of the Cabal is a dangerous card for your opponent that will cause him plenty of harm. It is important to note that this card is not like Pox, where a player sacrifices a portion of his land, then a portion of his creatures and so on. When Curse of the Cabal resolves, a target player will be forced to add up the total number of permanents that he controls, including lands, artifacts, creatures and enchantments, and then select half of them (rounded down) to be sacrificed. The permanents are sacrificed all at once, and not until the player has made his final decision on which permanents to keep and which to lose.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.5

DC-10: 3.5

 

Endrek Sahr, Master Breeder is a 2/2 legendary Human Wizard for 4B. Whenever you play a creature spell while Endrek is in play, put X 1/1 black Thrull creature tokens into play, where X is that spell’s converted mana cost. Whenever you control seven or more Thrulls, sacrifice Endrek Sahr. This is a very powerful card in limited, where you are certain to play creature spells very soon after you have played Endrek Sahr. This card will be good in certain types of constructed decks as well, particularly mono or nearly mono black creature decks as well as the Time Spiral block constructed decks of the future. One key when playing with Endrek Sahr is not to be afraid to end up with seven or more Thrull tokens. Don’t go out of your way to NOT play a big creature just because playing it will cause you to end up with seven or more Thrulls and therefore lose Endrek Sahr. The best way to use your Thrull tokens is to attack with them each turn before you cast any more creatures. This is just about the best token generating black card ever!

LIMITED: 4.0

CONSTRUCTED: 4.0

DC-10: 3.5

 

Evangelize is a sorcery for 4W, with Buyback and a Buyback cost of 2WW, that allows you to gain control of target creature of an opponent’s choice that he or she controls. In other words, when you play this spell, you will gain control of one of your opponent’s creatures, your opponent gets to decide which one. This sizable drawback makes it kind of hard for me to fall in love with Evangelize, especially in limited where room in your deck is tight to begin with. I have to admit that I have not played this card yet, but I suspect I might like to sideboard it in if my opponent has a single creature that gives my deck a lot of trouble. Buyback certainly does make this card better, but seriously, you won’t be using Buyback with Evangelize until turn fifteen or so. This card could be very useful in constructed sideboards against decks that never have more than a single creature in play, like the control decks that are becoming much more popular with the release of Time Spiral.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 4.0

DC-10: 4.0

 

Gemstone Caverns is a legendary land that taps for colorless mana. However, if Gemstone Caverns is in your opening hand and you are not playing first, you may remove a card in your hand from the game to put Gemstone Caverns into play with a luck counter on it. If Gemstone Caverns has a luck counter on it, it can be tapped for any color mana. A lot of people were very excited to learn about this land, right until they saw that it was legendary. The idea was that this card would immediately become a four-of in constructed decks. What this card does is certainly exciting and kind of refreshing. This card allows you to have two land in play on your first turn (assuming you are able to play a land on your first turn) for the slight cost of not playing first and the larger requirement of having Gemstone Caverns in your opening hand. The legendary rule will make it harder to include four copies of this rare land in your constructed decks, but it makes a single copy of the card fit just fine in limited decks. Very often, especially in sealed deck but sometimes in booster drafts as well, you would rather go second anyway and go for card advantage.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.5

DC-10: 0.5

 

Ixidron is a */* Illusion creature or 3UU that turns all nontoken creatures in play face down when it comes into play (they are turned into 2/2 colorless creatures just like face down morph creatures), where Ixidron’s power and toughness are equal to the number of face down creatures in play. This creature has possibilities. Suppose you and your opponent have roughly the same number of creatures in play, but his creature quality is a little better than yours and you want to turn the tables? Play Ixidron and watch your opponent become sadder. Ixidron works the best when some of your own creatures have the morph ability so that they can flip themselves back face up at some point. Of course, since Ixidron’s power and toughness are based on the number of face down creatures, his usefulness will be situational. Ixidron could be useful, but he is far from a must-play. In constructed Magic, Ixidron seems even worse.

LIMITED: 3.0

CONSTRUCTED: 1.5

DC-10: 2.0

 

Magus of the Disk is a 2/4 Human Wizard for 2WW that comes into play tapped. This creature can be tapped, along with the cost of one colorless mana, to destroy all artifacts, creatures and enchantments. Yes, that’s right, this creature is the living incarnation of the long lost Nevinyrral’s Disk. This card, like other powerful old cards that are sort-of reprinted as new cards in Time Spiral, has a number of drawbacks compared to the original card. Unlike the Disk, Magus has a power and a toughness, so he can be destroyed by a giant number of cards that would not be able to destroy a Nev’s Disk. More importantly, Nevinyrral’s Disk is an artifact costing four colorless mana. Magus of the Disk also costs four mana to play, but two of them have to be white. Complaints aside, Magus of the Disk is an amazing card, certainly the closest thing to Nev’s Disk to be produced in many years. Control decks are coming back in a big way to constructed, and cards like Magus of the Disk are leading the way.

LIMITED: 4.5

CONSTRUCTED: 4.0

DC-10: 4.0

 

Mangara of Corondor is a 1/1 legendary Human Wizard for 1WW that taps to remove itself and a target permanent from the game. This card is basically a somewhat “nerfed” version of Vindicate, but that’s okay, you get a three casting cost spell that can actually destroy any type of permanent. Very useful. What is MORE useful is the ways in which Mangara’s capability can be improved. Mangara’s ability only has one target, the target permanent you wish to destroy. You can tap Mangara targeting the permanent you wish to destroy, then respond with a bounce spell or a card like Momentary Blink to remove Mangara from play temporarily. When Mangara’s ability resolves, it doesn’t matter if Mangara is still around to be removed, the target named when the ability was played WILL be removed from the game. Even better, since Mangara’s ability only names one target, if that target is destroyed or removed from play before the ability resolves, the ability will be countered with no legal target, leaving Mangara in play for you! This card should see constructed use.

LIMITED: 4.0

CONSTRUCTED: 4.0

DC-10: 4.0

 

Moonlace is an instant for one blue mana that makes a target spell or permanent become colorless. This might be the ultimate Lace spell, twelve years after the five colored Lace spells were last printed in Magic’s Revised edition. This card can be used to mess with cards with protection from certain colors or other such whimsical endeavors. Not really my cup of tea.

LIMITED: 2.5

CONSTRUCTED: 2.0

DC-10: 1.5

 

Nether Traitor is a 1/1 Spirit with haste and shadow for two black mana. Whenever another creature is put into your graveyard, you may pay one black mana to return Nether Traitor to play from your graveyard. This card has more of a chance of affecting constructed Magic than it does limited. In limited, you would be very unlikely to have more than one of these guys, and one Nether Traitor might not be useful enough in helping you win games in most limited matchups.

LIMITED: 3.0

CONSTRUCTED: 4.0

DC-10: 3.0

 

Sengir Nosferatu is a 4/4 flying Vampire for 3BB that can be removed from the game whenever you play his activated ability for 1B putting a 1/2 black Bat creature token with flying into play. The bat token created by Nosferatu has the ability, for 1B, to be removed from play returning Sengir Nosferatu from the removed-from-play zone back into play. Basically, for 1B, Sengir Nosferatu can jump out of the way of practically any danger and then jump back into play for another 1B when the coast is clear. Great in limited, not necessarily good enough for constructed.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.0

DC-10: 4.0

 

Stonewood Invocation is an instant for 3G with Split Second that gives a target creature +5/+5 until end of turn and makes that creature unable to be targeted by spells or abilities until end of turn. Good limited players that I have talked to think this card is very good at the four mana cost, but I’m not completely convinced, seems to me this card might be at least one mana too high for a rare instant that doesn’t give your target creature the game-ending ability of trample. Split Second certainly does make this card a lot better than the run of the mill creature pump spell, since it makes Stonewood Invocation uncounterable and makes it much harder for your opponent to respond by removing the creature that you are targeting with Invocation.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.5

DC-10: 3.5

 

Stuffy Doll is an 0/1 Construct artifact creature for five colorless mana. When this creature comes into play, you choose a player. Stuffy Doll is indestructible. Whenever damage is dealt to Stuffy Doll, Stuffy Doll deals that amount of damage to the chosen player. You can tap Stuffy Doll to deal one damage to itself. This card is very elegantly designed and is almost irresistible for anyone who has not yet played him. However, while Stuffy Doll makes an interesting ground staller that can combo with some other cards in Time Spiral, he really is not a big enough difference maker in limited play to take too seriously.

LIMITED: 3.0

CONSTRUCTED: 2.0

DC-10: 3.0

 

Thelonite Hermit is a 1/1 Elf Shaman for 3G that gives all Saprolings +1/+1. This card has a morph cost of 3GG, and when Thelonite Hermit is turned face up, it puts four 1/1 green Saproling tokens into play. The only downside of this card, if you want to call it that, is the fact that you need to play it face down and then pay kind of a lot to morph it face up. Okay, there IS another downside, you have to go to all this trouble and then have a difficult-to-protect 1/1 Elf Shaman on your hands. In constructed formats, this creature may be surrounded by other Elves or other Saproling-powered effects that can help protect it. In limited, the name of the game will simply be to get this guy morphed as quickly as possible to provide yourself with some board advantage or perhaps the ability to block a larger number of creatures with a higher than anticipated number of creatures.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 4.0

DC-10: 4.0

 

Vesuvan Shapeshifter is a 0/0 Shapeshifter for 3UU with a morph cost of 1U. When Vesuvan Shapeshifter comes into play or is morphed from a face down position, you may choose another creature in play turning Vesuvan Shapeshifter into a copy of that creature until you choose to turn Vesuvan Shapeshifter face down, which you may choose to do at the beginning of your upkeep. This card comes very close to being BETTER than the Vesuvan Doppleganger it updates. This card is very powerful in limited and may have a chance in constructed as well. The ability of this Shapeshifter to become a different creature every turn is very interesting and useful.

LIMITED: 4.0

CONSTRUCTED: 3.5

DC-10: 3.5

 

Wheel of Fate is a sorcery with no casting cost but with Suspend 4 and a Suspend cost of 1R. Wheel of Fate is the new, nerfed up version of Wheel of Fortune. Unlike most other cards with the Suspend ability, Wheel of Fate does NOT have a normal casting cost, making it only playable by means of suspending it. When Wheel of Fate does eventually shed its last time counter, it causes each player to discard their hand and then draw seven cards. This card is probably better in constructed, where mono red burn decks can put it on the back burner with suspend on turn two and then empty their hands in the next three turns before the fourth time counter comes off of the Wheel, reloading the red mage’s hand, hopefully in a way that is more immediately beneficial than to the opponent. The biggest problem with Wheel of Fate in constructed is that many control players will find and hold onto a counter spell of some kind so that they can counter the Wheel when it is finally played without cost during your upkeep. (You have to remember that suspend does not mean that the card is played, suspended cards are played when their last time counter has been removed)

LIMITED: 3.0

CONSTRUCTED: 4.0

DC-10: 3.0

 

REVIEWS OF SOME TIME SHIFTED CARDS USED IN THIS TOURNAMENT

 

(for those of you who need a refresher course on the old cards)

 

Gemstone Mine is a land that comes into play with three mining counters on it. When you tap Gemstone Mine, you remove a mining counter and you add one mana of any color to your mana pool. When there are no more mining counters on Gemstone Mine, you must sacrifice it. At the PTQ last weekend, I noticed that lots of people were leaving Gemstone Mine out of their decks. I think that is a mistake. In any Time Spiral limited format, but much more so in sealed deck where you are more likely playing a third color, Gemstone Mine gives you a reliable way to reach a second or third color when you need to. Yes, it’s a bummer that you only get to use the Mine three times before it is lost forever. That’s okay, it’s STILL very good. I think younger players have simply not tried this card before and I think some of the older players (who should know better) have forgotten how useful Gemstone Mine can be.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 4.0

DC-10: 0.0

 

Grinning Totem is a four colorless mana cost artifact that activates for two mana and tapping and sacrificing the Totem. When you activate the Grinning Totem, you search your opponent’s library for any one card and remove that card from the game. Until the beginning of your next upkeep, you may play that card. This card is hardly ever a wasted card, so it’s okay to play it in your limited decks. Grinning Totem is very adaptable, since you can use it to steal a powerful card from your opponent’s deck that you might be able to actually cast and use yourself, but you can also use the Totem to simply take a powerful card away from your opponent. The big downside, of course, is that you are using a card to get rid of something your opponent might never even draw. Once a very popular sideboard card in constructed, Grinning Totem may not be any better than a limited format sideboard card to use when your opponent has a powerful bomb card in his forty card limited deck that you have no other way to stop.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.0

DC-10: 5.0

 

Merieke Ri Berit is a 1/1 legendary Human for a casting cost of one black, one white and one blue mana. Merieke does not untap during your untap step. You can tap Merieke to gain control of a target creature as long as you control Merieke. When Merieke leaves play or becomes untapped, destroy the creature you gained control of, it cannot be regenerated. While too much water has passed under the Magic bridge for this card to matter in constructed (maybe it’s just the mana cost), Merieke Ri Berit will be a powerful card players will splash for in their limited decks, whether it is a white splash in a blue/black deck or a black splash in a blue/white deck. In limited, Merieke is pretty close to a bomb, giving you the ability to steal any creature on the board and to destroy that creature in the event that your Merieke becomes destroyed (or even simply bounced or untapped!).

LIMITED: 4.0

CONSTRUCTED: 2.5

DC-10: 3.5

 

Sol’kanar the Swamp King is a 5/5 legendary Demon with Swampwalk for 2UBR that gains a life for you whenever anyone plays a black spell. Long time no see, my old friend! This is one of the cards that literally gave me chills when I discovered him reprinted in Time Spiral. A few things have changed since Sol’kanar was last legal for Standard constructed (we gray haired wizards still prefer ‘Type II’), so this mighty legend may not be headed for constructed success. No problem, he is quite a powerful card in limited, provided you can figure out a way to cast him. If your deck’s mana base can handle him, Sol’kanar has the ability to come into play on turn five and make life very difficult for your opponent right away.

LIMITED: 4.0

CONSTRUCTED: 3.5

DC-10: 4.5

 

Soul Collector is a 3/4 flying Vampire for 3BB that morphs for three black mana. Whenever a creature dealt damage by Soul Collector is put into a graveyard from play, it is returned to play under your control. Whether you play this card face up or face down, Soul Collector is a great creature in any limited format. Time will tell if mono black creature decks become popular enough to make Soul Collector a big deal in the coming year in constructed play.

LIMITED: 4.0

CONSTRUCTED: 3.5

DC-10: 3.5

 

Teferi’s Moat is an enchantment that costs 3WU to cast. When Teferi’s Moat comes into play, choose a color. Creatures of the chosen color can’t attack you unless they have flying. I don’t believe that this card was historically popular in constructed (and it won’t be now, either) but limited is another story entirely. Time Spiral booster draft is a format where players are able to build decks that are tightly in just two colors, generally speaking, making Teferi’s Moat more powerful in limited now than when it was first printed.

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.0

DC-10: 3.0

 

Wall of Roots is an 0/5 Plant Wall that costs 1G to play and has Defender. You can put an -0/-1 counter on Wall of Roots to put one green mana into your mana pool. You can only use this ability once per turn. This classic card from Mirage was a very popular card in limited as well as constructed when it first appeared ten years ago. If aggressive creature decks can maintain a position of prominence among the crowded field of new control decks, then Wall of Roots will again be popular in constructed decks where it can block early threats while provided much needed mana acceleration. In limited, Wall of Roots will be good again in limited as well, and probably even a little better in sealed deck. Pretty darned good for a wall!

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.5

DC-10: 2.5

 

Witch Hunter is a 1/1 Human Cleric for 2WW, originally printed in The Dark. Witch Hunter taps to deal a point of damage to a target player, or taps with the additional cost of 1WW to return a target creature an opponent controls to their hand. Color wheel Schmolor wheel! This white card pings your opponent like a red card and bounces their creatures like a blue card. As Halloween approaches, put aside your prejudices and take this full figured lady for a trip around the dance floor!

LIMITED: 3.5

CONSTRUCTED: 3.0

DC-10: 3.0

 

CARD LISTS FROM THE PACKS USED IN THIS TOURNAMENT

 

The card lists below are named by the first word in the name of the Time Spiral rare in each pack. For purposes of the DC-10 Showdown, these names are also used as if they were the name of the player using that particular pack’s fifteen cards as their “deck”.

 

CANDLES

Candles of Leng

Fallen Ideal

Molten Slagheap

Vampiric Sliver

Amrou Seekers

Temporal Eddy

Drudge Reavers

Molder

Ground Rift

Viscid Lemures

Shadow Sliver

Children of Korlis

Mogg War Marshal

Terramorphic Expanse

Shadowmage Infiltrator

 

CURSE

Curse of the Cabal

Ignite Memories

Durkwood Tracker

Opaline Sliver

Thallid Shell-Dweller

Mindstab

Castle Raptors

Jhoira’s Timebug

Spiketail Drakeling

Nantuko Shaman

Savage Thallid

Slipstream Serpent

Gorgon Recluse

Jedit’s Dragoons

Mystic Enforcer

 

ENDREK

Endrek Sahr, Master Breeder

Harmonic Sliver

Durkwood Tracker

Voidmage Husher

Outrider en-Kor (FOIL)

Cyclopean Giant

Durkwood Baloth

Ivory Giant

Mindstab

Coral Trickster

Call to the Netherworld

Gaze of Justice

Coal Stoker

Bewilder

Gemstone Mine

 

EVANGELIZE

Evangelize

Ghostflame Sliver

Tromp the Domains

Fungal Reaches

Flamecore Elemental

Dream Stalker

Feebleness

Strangling Soot

Ground Rift

Gemhide Sliver

Fathom Seer

Gaze of Justice

Wormwood Dryad

Venser’s Sliver

Merfolk Assassin

 

GEMSTONE

Gemstone Caverns

Chronatog Totem

Thick-Skinned Goblin

Sporesower Thallid

Basal Sliver

Havenwood Wurm

Drifter il-Dal

Think Twice

Tendrils of Corruption

Icatian Crier

Bonesplitter Sliver

Cancel

Empty the Warrens

Call to the Netherworld

Kobold Taskmaster

 

IXIDRON

Ixidron

Evil Eye of Urborg

Barbed Shocker

Phantom Wurm

Might of Old Krosa (FOIL)

Temporal Isolation

Tendrils of Corruption

Lightning Axe

Watcher Sliver

Ironclaw Buzzardiers

Mogg War Marshal

Plunder

Thrill of the Hunt

Temporal Eddy

Merieke Ri Berit

 

 

MAGUS

Magus of the Disk

Barbed Shocker

Yavimaya Dryad

Ghostflame Sliver

Trespasser il-Vec

Momentary Blink

Flowstone Channeler

Grapeshot

Brass Gnat

Herd Gnarr

Errant Ephemeron

Deathspore Thallid

Savage Thallid

Screeching Sliver

Grinning Totem

 

 

MANGARA

Mangara of Corondor

Knight of the Holy Nimbus

Firemaw Kavu

Skittering Monstrosity

Ghitu Firebreathing

Rift Bolt

Assassinate

Penumbra Spider

Momentary Blink

Aether Web

Amrou Seekers

Sage of Epityr

Errant Doomsayers

Greenseeker

Eron the Relentless

 

MOONLACE

Moonlace

Durkwood Tracker

Volcanic Awakening

Nightshade Assassin

Mana Skimmer

Amrou Scout

Scarwood Treefolk

Orcish Cannonade

Durkwood Baloth

Flickering Spirit

Call to the Netherworld

Ancient Grudge

Drifter il-Dal

Keldon Halberdier

Wall of Roots

 

NETHER

Nether Traitor

Plated Pegasus

Duskrider Peregrine

Might of Old Krosa

Fortify

Spiketail Drakeling

Nantuko Shaman

Wormwood Dryad

Coral Trickster

Flamecore Elemental

Mystical Teachings

Mana Skimmer

Two-Headed Sliver

Prismatic Lens

Evil Eye of Orms-by-Gore

 

SENGIR

Sengir Nosferatu

Phyrexian Totem

Scryb Ranger

Stormcloud Djinn

Chromatic Star

Flowstone Channeler

Watcher Sliver

Glass Asp

Island (FOIL)

Traitor’s Clutch

Trespasser il-Vec

Blazing Blade Askari

Tolarian Sentinel

Castle Raptors

Fire Whip

 

STONEWOOD

Stonewood Invocation

Cavalry Master

Clockwork Hydra

Conflagrate

Mystical Teachings

Looter il-Kor

Children of Korlis

Feebleness

Coral Trickster

Benalish Cavalry

Spinneret Sliver

Viashino Bladescout

Sangrophage

Keldon Halberdier

Witch Hunter

 

STUFFY

Stuffy Doll

Brine Elemental

Clockwork Hydra

Fledgling Mawcor

Forest (FOIL)

Ophidian Eye

Scarwood Treefolk

Watcher Sliver

Amrou Scout

Trespasser il-Vec

Grapeshot

Slipstream Serpent

Thrill of the Hunt

Shadow Sliver

Soul Collector

 

THELONITE

Thelonite Hermit

Truth or Tale

Telekinetic Sliver

Phyrexian Totem

Dream Stalker

Gaze of Justice

Brass Gnat

Strangling Soot

Flamecore Elemental

Fathom Seer

Skulking Knight

Gemhide Sliver

Feebleness

Plunder

Resurrection

 

VESUVAN

Vesuvan Shapeshifter

Dreadship Reef

Firemaw Kavu

Evil Eye of Urborg

Errant Doomsayers

Cyclopean Giant

Empty the Warrens

Viscerid Deepwalker

Brass Gnat

Savage Thallid

Crookclaw Transmuter

Corpulent Corpse

Call to the Netherworld

Strength in Numbers

Teferi’s Moat

 

 

WHEEL

Wheel of Fate

Saltcrusted Steppe

Celestial Crusader

Faceless Devourer

Bogardan Rager

Spinneret Sliver

Chromatic Star

Flowstone Channeler

Tolarian Sentinel

D’Avenant Healer

Sangrophage

Trespasser il-Vec

Clockspinning

Castle Raptors

Sol’kanar the Swamp King

 

TOURNAMENT MATCHES

 

The game play of each two pack match up is detailed below, play by play. In the first round of this single elimination tournament, the ideas is that the player of each pack knows neither the contents of his own pack nor the contents of any other player’s pack. The “players” play DC-10 using their packs as their library after having shuffled their pack before each game and using a random method to determine who would play first. Players are treated as not knowing what cards their opponent has drawn until that information becomes known by those cards being played or otherwise revealed in the course of normal game play.

 

ROUND ONE

(each round one match consists of a single game)

 

Mangara versus Thelonite

T1 Mangara draws and plays Skittering Monstrosity.

T1 Thelonite draws and plays Skulking Knight.

T2 Mangara draws Firemaw Kavu, attacks with Monstrosity (20-15)

T2 Thelonite draws Plunder, attacks with Knight (17-15)

T3 Mangara draws Knight of the Holy Nimbus, attacks with Monstrosity (17-10)

T3 Thelonite draws and plays Feebleness on Skittering Monstrosity, attacks with Knight (14-10)

T4 Mangara draws Eron the Relentless. Plays Firemaw Kavu targeting Skulking Knight, plays Knight of the Holy Nimbus, plays Eron the Relentless. Attacks with Eron (14-5)

T4 Thelonite draws and plays Gemhide Sliver.

T5 Mangara pays echo costs for Firemaw Kavu, draws Mangara of Corondor, attacks with Knight, Firemaw and Eron, Eron blocked by Gemhide Sliver (14- -1)

MANGARA WINS GAME

 

Magus versus Shadowmage

T1 Magus draws Grapeshot.

T1 Shadowmage draws and plays Viscid Lemures

T2 Magus draws and plays Flowstone Channeler.

T2 Shadowmage draws Ground Rift, attacks with Lemures (16-20)

T3 Magus draws Magus of the Disk. Attacks with Channeler (16-18), plays Magus of the Disk.

T3 Shadowmage draws Molder. Attacks with Lemures (12-18).

T4 Magus draws Grinning Totem. Attacks with Channeler (12-16). Activates Magus of the Disk destroying all creatures, artifacts and enchantments in play. Plays Grinning Totem, activates Grinning Totem searching opponent’s library for Shadowmage Infiltrator, plays Shadowmage Infiltrator.

T4 Shadowmage draws Molten Slagheap.

T5 Magus draws and plays Barbed Shocker, attacks with Infiltrator and Shocker (12-13) drawing Momentary Blink with Infiltrator’s ability and causing Shadowmage to discard Ground Rift, Molder and Molten Slagheap drawing Mogg War Marshal, Children of Korlis and Vampiric Sliver.

T5 Shadowmage draws and plays Shadow Sliver. Plays Vampiric Sliver, Mogg War Marshal and Children of Korlis.

T6 Magus draws and plays Savage Thallid.

T6 Shadowmage pays echo costs for Mogg War Marshal, draws Terramorphic Expanse, attacks with Shadow Sliver and Vampiric Sliver (8-13)

T7 Magus draws and plays Deathspore Thallid, attacks with Infiltrator (8-12) drawing and playing Trespasser il-Vec.

T7 Shadowmage draws Drudge Reavers. Attacks with Shadow Sliver and Vampiric Sliver, Magus discards Momentary Blink to give Trespasser il-Vec shadow, blocks Vampiric Sliver (7-12).

T8 Magus draws and plays Screeching Sliver, at end of turn, Shadowmage plays Drudge Reavers, Magus removes three counters from Savage Thallid to create a Saproling, activates Deathspore Thallid sacrificing the Saproling to give -1/-1 to Drudge Reavers.

T8 Shadowmage draws Fallen Ideal. Attacks with Shadow Sliver (6-12).

T9 Magus draws and plays Yavimaya Dryad.

T9 Shadowmage draws Candles of Leng. At end of turn, Magus taps Screeching Sliver milling Temporal Eddy to Shadowmage’s graveyard.

T10 Magus draws and plays Ghostflame Sliver, taps Screeching Sliver to mill Shadowmage’s last card in his library into his graveyard, Amrou Seekers.

MAGUS WINS GAME

 

Sengir versus Moonlace

T1 Sengir draws and plays Castle Raptors

T1 Moonlace draws Keldon Halberdier.

T2 Sengir draws Tolarian Sentinel, attacks with Castle Raptors (20-17), plays Tolarian Sentinel. At end of turn, Moonlace plays Keldon Halberdier.

T2 Moonlace draws Ancient Grudge. Attacks with Halberdier (16-17)

T3 Sengir draws Trespasser il-Vec, attacks with Sentinel and Raptors (16-13), plays Trespasser il-Vec.

T3 Moonlace draws Durkwood Tracker, attacks with Halberdier (12-13), plays Durkwood Tracker.

T4 Sengir draws Blazing Blade Askari, attacks with Trespasser and Raptors, Trespasser blocked by Durkwood Tracker (12-10), plays Blazing Blade Askari.

T4 Moonlace draws Call to the Netherworld. Attacks with Halberdier (8-10)

T5 Sengir draws and plays Traitor’s Clutch targeting Sentinel, then flashes back Traitor’s Clutch targeting Askari, attacks with Askari, Sentinel and Raptors (8-2).

T5 Moonlace draws Drifter il-Dal, CONCEDES

SENGIR WINS GAME

 

Wheel versus Nether

T1 Wheel draws Celestial Crusader.

T1 Nether draws and plays Spiketail Drakeling. At end of turn, Wheel plays Celestial Crusader.

T2 Wheel draws and plays Castle Raptors.

T2 Nether draws Fortify.

T3 Wheel draws Clockspinning. Attacks with Raptors, blocked by Drakeling, Nether plays Fortify giving his Drakeling +2/+0.

T3 Nether draws Might of Old Krosa.

T4 Wheel draws and plays D’Avenant Healer, attacks with Crusader (20-18)

T4 Nether draws and plays Nether Traitor, attacks with Traitor (19-18)

T5 Wheel draws Saltcrusted Steppe. Attacks with Healer and Crusader (19-15)

T5 Nether draws Prismatic Lens, attacks with Traitor (18-15).

T6 Wheel draws and plays Sangrophage, attacks with Healer and Crusader (18-12).

T6 Nether draws and plays Mana Skimmer, attacks with Traitor (17-12)

T7 Wheel pays two life during upkeep for Sangrophage (15-12) draws and plays Trespasser il-Vec, attacks with Healer, Crusader and Sangrophage (15-5).

T7 Nether draws and plays Plated Pegasus.

T8 Wheel pays two life during upkeep for Sangrophage (13-5), draws Tolarian Sentinel, attacks with Crusader, Healer, Sangrophage and Trespasser, Nether blocks Crusader with Skimmer, blocks Trespasser with Pegasus. With combat damage on the stack, Nether plays Might of Old Krosa targeting Mana Skimmer (13-0)

WHEEL WINS GAME

 

Vesuvan versus Stonewood

T1 Vesuvan draws and plays Cyclopean Giant.

T1 Stonewood draws and plays Cavalry Master

T2 Vesuvan draws Viscerid Deepwalker, attacks with Giant (20-16), plays Viscerid Deepwalker.

T2 Stonewood draws Keldon Halberdier.

T3 Vesuvan draws Evil Eye of Urborg. Attacks with Cyclopean Giant blocked by Cavalry Master.

T3 Stonewood draws and plays Sangrophage.

T4 Vesuvan draws Empty the Warrens.

T4 Stonewood pays two life during upkeep for Sangrophage (20-14), draws Stonewood Incarnation, attacks with Sangrophage (17-14).

T5 Vesuvan draws Errant Doomsayers. Attacks with Viscerid Deepwalker, Stonewood plays Keldon Halberdier, blocks Deepwalker. Plays Errant Doomsayers, plays Evil Eye of Urborg, plays Empty the Warrens (putting six 1/1 Goblin tokens into play).

T5 Stonewood pays two life during upkeep for Sangrophage (17-12), draws Witch Hunter, attacks with Halberdier and Sangrophage, Sangrophage blocked by three 1/1 Goblin tokens and Halberdier blocked by one 1/1 Goblin token. Plays Witch Hunter.

T6 Vesuvan draws and plays Vesuvan Shapeshifter copying Evil Eye of Urborg, attacks with Evil Eye (17-6).

T6 Stonewood draws Viashino Bladescout. At end of turn, Vesuvan taps Witch Hunter with Doomsayer, Stonewood responds by activating Witch Hunter and returning Evil Eye of Urborg to Vesuvan’s Hand.

T7 Vesuvan draws Call to the Netherworld, taps Halberdier with Doomsayer and attacks with Vesuvan Shapeshifter (copying Evil Eye of Urborg), Stonewood plays Viashino Bladescout, Bladescout gives Bladescout first strike until end of turn, Bladescout blocks Vesuvan Shapeshifter, Stonewood plays Stonewood Invocation targeting Bladescout. Vesuvan plays Evil Eye of Urborg.

T7 Stonewood draws and plays Benalish Cavalry.

T8 Vesuvan draws and plays Savage Thallid, taps Halberdier, attacks with Evil Eye, Stonewood activates Witch Hunter to return Evil Eye of Urborg to Vesuvan’s hand. Vesuvan plays Evil Eye of Urborg.

T8 Stonewood draws and plays Spinneret Sliver.

T9 Vesuvan draws Teferi’s Moat. At end of turn, Stonewood activates Witch Hunter returning Evil Eye of Urborg to Vesuvan’s hand.

T9 Stonewood draws Coral Trickster, plays Coral Trickster face down. Attacks with Cavalry and Halberdier, Halberdier blocked by one Goblin token, (15-6). At end of turn, Vesuvan taps Witch Hunter with Doomsayer, Stonewood responds by activating Witch Hunter returning Doomsayer to Vesuvan’s hand.

T10 Vesuvan draws Strength in Numbers, plays Evil Eye of Urborg, Errant Doomsayer and Teferi’s Moat naming red.

T10 Stonewood draws and plays Feebleness targeting Errant Doomsayer.

T11 Vesuvan draws and plays Brass Gnat, attacks with Evil Eye of Urborg blocked by Bladescout.

T11 Stonewood draws and plays Conflagrate dealing 100 damage to Vesuvan.

STONEWOOD WINS GAME

 

Gemstone versus Endrek

T1 Gemstone draws and plays Basal Sliver.

T1 Endrek draws Gaze of Justice.

T2 Gemstone draws and plays Chronatog Totem, attacks with Basal Sliver (20-18).

T2 Endrek draws and plays Coral Trickster face down.

T3 Gemstone draws and plays Drifter il-Dal, activates Chronatog Totem, attacks with Atog and Sliver, Atog blocked by face down creature, Gemstone activates Chronatog Totem’s ability skipping his next turn to give the Atog +3/+3 until end of turn (20-16).

T3 Endrek draws Voidmage Husher.

T4 Endrek draws and plays Durkwood Tracker.

T4 Gemstone pays one blue mana in upkeep for Drifter il-Dal, draws Havenwood Wurm. Attacks with Chronatog and Drifter, Endrek plays Voidmage Husher, blocks Chronatog with Husher and Tracker, Gemstone activates Chronatog putting lethal damage on Durkwood Tracker (20-14).

T5 Endrek draws and plays Mindstab, Gemstone responds by playing Havenwood Wurm.

T6 Endrek draws and plays Ivory Giant.

T5 Gemstone pays one blue mana in upkeep for Drifter il-Dal, draws  Call to the Netherworld, attacks with Wurm and Drifter (20-7).

T7 Endrek draws Call of the Netherworld.

T6 Gemstone pays one blue mana in upkeep for Drifter il-Dal, draws Empty the Warrens, attacks with Wurm and Drifter, Wurm blocked by Ivory Giant (20-4).

T8 Endrek draws and plays Durkwood Baloth.

T7 Gemstone pays one blue mana in upkeep for Drifter il-Dal, draws Sporesower Thallid, attacks with Wurm, Drifter and Sliver, Wurm blocked by Baloth, Sliver blocked by Husher (20-2). Plays Call to the Netherworld targeting Basal Sliver, plays Basal Sliver, plays Sporesower Thallid, plays Empty the Warrens (with Storm) putting 8 1/1 Goblin tokens into play.

T9 Endrek draws Cyclopean Giant, CONCEDES

GEMSTONE WINS GAME

 

Ixidron versus Evangelize

T1 Ixidron draws and plays Evil Eye of Urborg.

T1 Evangelize draws and plays Merfolk Assassin.

T2 Ixidron draws and plays Ironclaw Buzzardiers, attacks with Evil Eye blocked by Merfolk Assassin.

T2 Evangelize draws Tromp the Domains.

T3 Ixidron draws and plays Merieke Ri Berit, attacks with Evil Eye (20-14).

T3 Evangelize draws and plays Ghostflame Sliver.

T4 Ixidron draws Watcher Sliver, attacks with Evil Eye blocked by Ghostflame Sliver. Plays Watcher Sliver.

T4 Evangelize draws and plays Venser’s Sliver.

T5 Ixidron draws Thrill of the Hunt, attacks with Evil Eye blocked by Venser’s Sliver.

T5 Evangelize draws Fungal Reaches.

T6 Ixidron draws Plunder, attacks with Evil Eye (20-8).

T6 Evangelize draws and plays Wormwood Dryad.

T7 Ixidron draws and plays Temporal Eddy putting Wormwood Dryad on top of Evangelize’s library, attacks with Evil Eye (20-2).

T7 Evangelize draws and plays Wormwood Dryad.

T8 Ixidron draws Mogg War Marshal, attacks with Evil Eye blocked by Wormwood Dryad.

T8 Evangelize draws Gaze of Justice, concedes.

IXIDRON WINS GAME

 

Stuffy versus Curse

T1 Stuffy draws Ophidian Eye.

T1 Curse draws and plays Mystic Enforcer.

T2 Stuffy draws Brine Elemental and plays the card face down.

T2 Curse draws Savage Thallid, attacks with Mystic Enforcer blocked by face down creature, Stuffy morphs the card turning it over to reveal Brine Elemental.

T3 Stuffy draws Slipstream Serpent and plays it face down, attacks with Brine Elemental blocked by Savage Thallid.

T3 Curse draws and plays Durkwood Tracker.

T4 Stuffy draws and plays Scarwood Treefolk, attacks with face down creature (20-18).

T4 Curse draws and plays Jhoira’s Timebug.

T5 Stuffy draws Grapeshot, attacks with Treefolk and face down creature, Curse blocks face down creature with Tracker. Stuffy morphs face down creature into Slipstream Serpent and plays Ophidian Eye enchanting Scarwood Treefolk. With combat damage on the stack, Curse activates Durkwood Tracker, dealing 4 points to the Serpent and causing the Serpent to deal 6 points to the Tracker (20-15) Stuffy draws Watchful Sliver.

T5 Curse draws Nantuko Shaman and pays 2GG to suspend the Shaman with one time counter on it, attacks with Timebug (19-15).

T6 Stuffy draws Soul Collector, attacks with Treefolk (19-12) drawing Amrou Scout. Plays Soul Collector face down.

T6 Curse plays Nantuko Shaman when the time counter is removed from it, drawing Spiketail Drakeling, then draws Opaline Sliver. Plays Spiketail Drakeling and Opaline Sliver.

T7 Stuffy draws and plays Trespasser il-Vec, Amrou Scout and Watchful Sliver. Plays Grapeshot putting three Storm copies of Grapeshot on the stack along with the original copy of Grapeshot, dealing 2 damage to Nantuko Shaman and 2 damage to Spiketail Drakeling. Attacks with face down creature and Treefolk, Treefolk blocked by Opaline Sliver (19-10).

T7 Curse draws and plays Castle Raptors.

T8 Stuffy draws Fledgling Mawcor and plays it face down. Attacks with third face down creature, Treefolk, Watchful Sliver, Amrou Scout and Trespasser, Curse blocks Treefolk with Raptors, Trespasser with Opaline Sliver and Scout with Timebug (19-6).

T8 Curse draws Mindstab.

T9 Stuffy draws Clockwork Hydra, attacks with face down creature number three, Treefolk and Watchful Sliver, Curse blocks Treefolk with Raptors, face down creature number three with Opaline Sliver. Stuffy morphs face down number three into Soul Collector, morphs face down creature number four into Fledgling Mawcor, taps Mawcor to deal one point of damage to Opaline Sliver. When Opaline Sliver goes to the graveyard, Soul Collector’s ability triggers returning Opaline Sliver into play on Stuffy’s side of the board (19-4).

T9 Curse draws Thallid Shell-Dweller and concedes

STUFFY WINS GAME

 

QUARTER FINAL ROUND

 

Matches are now best two out of three games

 

Mangara versus Magus

GAME ONE

T1 Mangara draws and plays Amrou Seekers.

T1 Magus draws and plays Barbed Shocker.

T2 Mangara draws and plays Sage of Epityr and puts the top four cards of his library back on top of the library in this order: Greenseeker, Rift Bolt, Penumbra Spider and Eron the Relentless. Attacks with Seekers (20-18).

T2 Magus draws Savage Thallid, administers the Shocker (18-18) and plays Savage Thallid.

T3 Mangara draws and plays Eron the Relentless, attacks with Seekers and Eron (18-11).

T3 Magus draws and plays Herd Gnarr. Attacks with Shocker and Thallid blocked by Sage of Epityr (16-11).

T4 Mangara draws and plays Penumbra Spider, attacks with Seekers and Eron (16-4).

T4 Magus draws Grapeshot, attacks with Savage Thallid blocked by Penumbra Spider. When Penumbra Spider goes to the graveyard, a 2/4 black spider token comes into play on Mangara’s side.

T5 Mangara draws Rift Bolt, attacks with Seekers and Eron blocked by Herd Gnarr (16-2). Mangara plays Rift Bolt targeting Magus (16- -1)

MANGARA WINS GAME ONE

 

GAME TWO

T1 Magus draws and plays Grinning Totem, then activates the Totem searching Mangara’s library and selecting Eron the Relentless. Magus plays Eron the Relentless and attacks (15-20).

T1 Mangara draws and plays Penumbra Spider.

T2 Magus draws Savage Thallid, attacks with Eron (10-20), plays Savage Thallid.

T2 Mangara draws and plays Skittering Monstrosity.

T3 Magus draws Grapeshot, attacks with Savage Thallid and Eron, Eron blocked by the Spider and Thallid blocked by Skittering Monstrosity, Magus regenerates Eron. When Penumbra Spider goes to the graveyard, a 2/4 black spider token comes into play on Mangara’s side.

T3 Mangara draws Rift Bolt.

T4 Magus draws and plays Screeching Sliver, attacks with Eron blocked by 2/4 spider token, Magus regenerates Eron.

T4 Mangara draws and plays Sage of Epityr looking at the top four cards of Mangara’s library and returning them in the following order: Assassinate, Momentary Blink, Greenseeker and Knight of the Holy Nimbus. Mangara plays Rift Bolt targeting Screeching Sliver.

T5 Magus draws and plays Barbed Shocker, plays Grapeshot putting one Storm copy of the spell on the stack dealing one point to Sage of Epityr and one point to Mangara (9-20), attacks with Eron and Shocker (2-20).

T5 Mangara draws Knight of the Holy Nimbus and concedes

MAGUS WINS GAME TWO

 

GAME THREE

T1 Mangara draws and plays Amrou Seekers.

T1 Magus draws and plays Trespasser il-Vec.

T2 Mangara draws Assassinate, attacks with Seekers (20-18).

T2 Magus draws Ghostflame Sliver, attacks with Trespasser (17-18), plays Ghostflame Sliver.

T3 Mangara draws and plays Penumbra Spider, attacks with Seekers (17-16), plays Assassinate targeting Trespasser.

T3 Magus draws and plays Flowstone Channeler.

T4 Mangara draws Skittering Monstrosity, attacks with Penumbra Spider and Seekers, Penumbra Spider blocked by Sliver and Channeler, Mangara applies the Spider’s damage to the Channeler (17-14), when the Penumbra Spider goes to the graveyard, a 2/4 black spider token comes into play on Mangara’s side. Mangara plays Skittering Monstrosity.

T4 Magus draws and plays Barbed Shocker.

T5 Mangara draws Knight of the Holy Nimbus, attacks with Seekers, 2/4 spider and Monstrosity, Magus blocks 2/4 spider with Sliver and Shocker, Mangara applies the spider’s damage to the Barbed Shocker (17-7).

T5 Magus draws and plays Magus of the Disk.

T6 Mangara draws Momentary Blink and attacks with Seekers and Monstrosity blocked by Sliver (17-5).

T6 Magus draws Momentary Blink.

T7 Mangara draws and plays Eron the Relentless, attacks with Seekers, Eron and Monstrosity, Magus activates Magus and destroys all creatures, artifacts and enchantments, in response Mangara regenerates Eron. Plays Knight of the Holy Nimbus.

T7 Magus draws and plays Yavimaya Dryad.

T8 Mangara draws and plays Sage of Epityr looking at and then replacing the top four cards of Mangara’s library in the following order: Greenseeker, Ghitu Firebreathing, Firemaw Kavu and Rift Bolt. Attacks with Knights and Eron with Dryad blocking Eron, with damage on the stack, Mangara regenerates Eron and Magus plays Momentary Blink targeting Yavimaya Dryad (17-3).

T8 Magus draws and plays Grinning Totem, activates Totem to search Mangara’s library choosing Firemaw Kavu. Magus plays Firemaw Kavu, dealing two damage to Knight of the Holy Nimbus, Mangara responds by playing Momentary Blink targeting Knight of the Holy Nimbus.

T9 Mangara draws Aether Web and attacks with Eron, Sage of Epityr and Knight, Magus blocks Eron with Dryad and Knight with Kavu, Mangara plays Aether Web targeting Sage of Epityr (17-1) Mangara regenerates Eron, when Firemaw Kavu goes to the graveyard it deals four damage to Sage of Epityr.

T9 Magus draws and plays Errant Ephemeron.

T10 Mangara draws Ghitu Firebreathing, attacks with Eron blocked by Errant Ephemeron, Mangara regenerates Eron.

T10 Magus draws and plays Screeching Sliver.

T11 Mangara draws and plays Mangara of Corondor, attacks with Eron blocked by Screeching Sliver.

T11 Magus draws Savage Thallid, concedes

MANGARA WINS GAME THREE, WINS MATCH 2-1

 

Ixidron versus Stuffy

GAME ONE

T1 Ixidron draws Ixidron.

T1 Stuffy draws Thrill of the Hunt.

T2 Ixidron draws and plays Evil Eye of Urborg.

T2 Stuffy draws and plays Amrou Scout.

T3 Ixidron draws Lightning Axe, attacks with Evil Eye (20-14).

T3 Stuffy draws Slipstream Serpent and plays it face down.

T4 Ixidron draws Temporal Eddy, attacks with Evil Eye blocked by Amrou Scout.

T4 Stuffy draws and plays Clockwork Hydra, attacks with face down creature, which Stuffy morphs into Slipstream Serpent (14-14).

T5 Ixidron draws Might of Old Krosa, attacks with Evil Eye (14-8).

T5 Stuffy draws Fledgling Mawcor and plays it face down, attacks with Clockwork Hydra (targeting Ixidron with the removed +1/+1 counter (13-8)) and Slipstream Eel (4-8), at end of turn, Ixidron plays Lightning Axe discarding Ixidron and targeting the face down creature, Stuffy responds by playing Thrill of the Hunt targeting the face down creature, then flashing back the Thrill of the Hunt from the graveyard targeting the face down creature.

T6 Ixidron draws Phantom Warrior, plays Temporal Eddy putting the face down creature (after it is revealed to Ixidron as a Fledgling Mawcor) back on top of Stuffy’s library. Ixidron plays Might of Old Krosa during his main phase targeting Evil Eye, attacks with Evil Eye (4- -2)

IXIDRON WINS GAME ONE

 

GAME TWO

T1 Stuffy draws and plays Clockwork Hydra.

T1 Ixidron draws and plays Mogg War Marshal.

T2 Stuffy draws Fledgling Mawcor and plays it face down, attacks with Hydra, removing a +1/+1 counter targeting the Mogg War Marshal, Ixidron blocks with one of his two 1/1 Goblin tokens.

T2 Ixidron draws and plays Barbed Shocker, attacks with Shocker (20-18).

T3 Stuffy draws Ophidian Eye, attacks with Hydra removing a +1/+1 counter targeting Barbed Shocker, morphing face down creature into Fledgling Mawcor, plays Ophidian Eye as an instant enchanting Hydra (18-18) drawing Soul Collector, plays Soul Collector face down, taps Mawcor targeting Barbed Shocker.

T3 Ixidron draws and plays Temporal Eddy returning Clockwork Hydra to the top of Stuffy’s library.

T4 Stuffy draws and plays Clockwork Hydra, attacks with face down creature and Mawcor (14-18).

T4 Ixidron draws Lightning Axe.

T5 Stuffy draws Grapeshot, declares an attack, Ixidron plays Lightning Axe targeting Clockwork Hydra, Stuffy attacks with face down creature and Mawcor (10-18).

T5 Ixidron draws and plays Ironclaw Buzzardiers.

T6 Stuffy draws Thrill of the Hunt, attacks with face down creature and Mawcor (6-18).

T6 Ixidron draws and plays Temporal Isolation on Stuffy’s face down creature, attacks with Buzzardiers (6-16).

T7 Stuffy draws and plays Watchful Sliver, attacks with Mawcor, plays Thrill of the Hunt targeting Mawcor, then flashes back Thrill of the Hunt from the graveyard targeting Mawcor (2-16). Stuffy plays Grapeshot targeting Ixidron and putting three Storm copies of Grapeshot on the stack, all targeting Ixidron (-2 -16)

STUFFY WINS GAME TWO

 

GAME THREE

T1 Ixidron draws and plays Phantom Wurm.

T1 Stuffy draws Brine Elemental and puts it into play face down.

T2 Ixidron draws Might of Old Krosa, attacks with Wurm blocked by face down creature, who Stuffy morphs into Brine Elemental (both creatures are destroyed).

T2 Stuffy draws and plays Scarwood Treefolk.

T3 Ixidron draws and plays Ironclaw Buzzardiers.

T3 Stuffy draws Slipstream Serpent and plays it face down, attacks with Treefolk (17-20).

T4 Ixidron draws and plays Barbed Shocker, activates Buzzardier’s ability to gain flying and attacks with Buzzardiers (17-18).

T4 Stuffy draws and plays Clockwork Hydra, attacks with Treefolk and face down creature, Shocker blocks face down creature which Stuffy morphs into Slipstream Serpent (14-18).

T5 Ixidron draws Ixidron, gives Buzzardiers flying and attacks with Buzzardiers (14-16), plays Ixidron turning all other creatures face down making Ixidron a 4/4 creature at this time.

T5 Stuffy draws Ophidian Eye, attacks with all creatures, Ixidron blocks face down creature (Scarwood Treefolk), Stuffy morphs face down creature into Slipstream Serpent, plays Ophidian Eye as an instant enchanting the Serpent (6-16) drawing FOIL forest.

(Ixidron-the-creature dies, having taken two damage and now a 2/2 creature.

T6 Ixidron draws Thrill of the Hunt.

T6 Stuffy draws and plays Stuffy Doll targeting Ixidron, attacks with Slipstream Serpent and face down creature (Clockwork Hydra), Ixidron’s face down blocks the Serpent, Ixidron plays Thrill of the Hunt targeting his face down (Buzzardiers), flashes back Thrill of the Hunt from the graveyard targeting the face down Buzzardiers again, then plays Might of Old Krosa targeting Buzzardiers (4-16).

T7 Ixidron draws and plays Evil Eye of Urborg.

T7 Stuffy draws and plays Shadow Sliver.

T8 Ixidron draws and plays Temporal Isolation enchanting Stuffy Doll, Stuffy responds by activating Stuffy Doll’s ability (3-16). Ixidron attacks with Evil Eye blocked by face down creature (Clockwork Hydra).

T8 Stuffy draws and plays Watchful Sliver, attacks with Shadow Sliver (2-16).

T9 Ixidron draws Merieke Ri Berit, concedes

STUFFY WINS GAME THREE, WINS MATCH 2-1

 

Stonewood versus Gemstone

T1 Stonewood draws and plays Cavalry Master.

T1 Gemstone draws and plays Icatian Crier.

T2 Stonewood draws Viashino Bladescout, attacks with Cavalry Master (20-17).

T2 Gemstone draws and plays Sporesower Thallid, attacks with Crier, Stonewood responds by playing Viashino Bladescout as an instant giving itself first strike and blocking the Crier.

T3 Stonewood draws and plays Spinneret Sliver, attacks with Cavalry Master blocked by Sporesower Thallid.

T3 Gemstone draws and plays Chronatog Totem.

T4 Stonewood draws Stonewood Invocation, attacks with Sliver and Bladescout, Gemstone activates Totem and blocks Sliver, then activates Totem to give the Totem +3/+3, Stonewood responds by playing Stonewood Invocation targeting the Sliver (20-15).

T5 Stonewood draws Coral Trickster and plays him face down, attacks with Sliver and Bladescout (20-11).

T4 Gemstone draws and plays Think Twice drawing Bonesplitter Sliver, plays Think Twice (with flashback) from the graveyard drawing Gemstone Caverns, plays Bonesplitter Sliver, at end of turn, Stonewood morphs his face down creature into Coral Trickster tapping the Bonesplitter Sliver.

T6 Stonewood draws and plays Mystical Teachings and gets Feebleness from his library, attacks with Trickster, Spinneret and Bladescout, Spinneret blocked by Bonesplitter (20-7).

T5 Gemstone draws and plays Drifter il-Dal.

T7 Stonewood draws and plays Children of Korlis, attacks with Trickster and Bladescout (20-3).

T6 Gemstone pays one blue upkeep for Drifter, draws Havenwood Wurm, attacks with Drifter (18-3).

T8 Stonewood draws Looter il-Kor, attacks with Children, Trickster and Bladescout, Gemstone concedes.

STONEWOOD WINS GAME ONE

 

GAME TWO

T1 Gemstone draws and plays Chronatog Totem.

T1 Stonewood draws and plays Witch Hunter.

T2 Gemstone draws Gemstone Caverns, activates Chronatog Totem and attacks (19-20).

T2 Stonewood draws Feebleness.

T3 Gemstone draws and plays Tendrils of Corruption targeting Witch Hunter, Stonewood responds by playing Feebleness targeting Witch Hunter and causing Tendrils of Corruption to be countered with no legal target at resolution time. Gemstone activates Chronatog Totem and attacks (18-20).

T3 Stonewood draws Coral Trickster and plays it face down.

T4 Gemstone draws Empty the Warrens.

T4 Stonewood draws Cavalry Master, attacks with face down creature, Gemstone activates Chronatog Totem and blocks, Stonewood morphs face down creature into Coral Trickster tapping the Chronatog, Gemstone activates Chronatog Totem giving itself +3/+3. Stonewood plays Cavalry Master.

T5 Stonewood draws and plays Looter il-Kor, attacks with Cavalry Master (18-17).

T5 Gemstone draws and plays Sporesower Thallid, Empty the Warrens with one Storm copy putting a total of 4 1/1 Goblin tokens into play, activates Chronatog Totem and attacks (17-17).

T6 Stonewood draws Benalish Cavalry, attacks with Looter (17-16) drawing Keldon Halberdiers and discarding Benalish Cavalry.

T6 Gemstone draws Call to the Netherworld, attacks with Sporesower Thallid, Stonewood responds by playing Keldon Halberdiers as an instant, blocking the Thallid.

T7 Stonewood draws Stonewood Invocation, attacks with Looter (17-15) drawing and discarding Sangrophage.

T7 Gemstone draws and plays Drifter il-Dal.

T8 Stonewood draws and plays Spinneret Sliver, attacks with Cavalry Master and Halberdiers, Gemstone activates Chronatog Totem and blocks Halberdiers, blocks Cavalry Master with a 1/1 Goblin token, with first strike combat damage on the stack, Gemstone activates Chronatog giving himself +3/+3.

T9 Stonewood draws Viashino Bladescout, attacks with Sliver, Looter and Cavalry Master, Gemstone activates Chronatog Totem and blocks Cavalry Master, blocks Spinneret Sliver with two 1/1 Goblin Tokens and blocks Looter with Drifter, Stonewood activates Chronatog giving itself +3/+3, Stonewood responds by playing Stonewood Invocations targeting the Cavalry Master, Stonewood plays Viashino Bladescout as an instant giving Looter first strike.

T10 Stonewood draws Clockwork Hydra, attacks with Cavalry Master, Looter and Bladescout, Gemstone blocks Cavalry Master with his last creature, a 1/1 Goblin token (17-12) Stonewood draws (from Looter’s ability) Conflagrate discarding Clockwork Hydra. Stonewood plays Conflagrate dealing 249 points of damage to Gemstone.

STONEWOOD WINS GAME TWO, WINS MATCH 2-0

 

Sengir versus Wheel

GAME ONE

T1 Sengir draws and plays Sengir Nosferatu.

T1 Wheel draws and plays Castle Raptors.

T2 Sengir draws Phyrexian Totem, attacks with Nosferatu blocked by Raptors, plays Phyrexian Totem.

T2 Wheel draws and plays Tolarian Sentinel.

T3 Sengir draws and plays Stormcloud Djinn, activates and attacks with Phyrexian Totem and Nosferatu, Nosferatu blocked by Raptors and Sentinel, with combat damage on the stack, Sengir activates Nosferatu removing it from the game and replacing it with a 1/2 Bat token (20-15).

T3 Wheel draws and plays D’Avenant Healer, at end of turn, Sengir activates Bat token returning Nosferatu to play after sacrificing the Bat token.

T4 Sengir draws and plays Castle Raptors, activates Phyrexian Totem, attacks with Stormcloud Djinn, Totem and Nosferatu, Djinn blocked by Caste Raptors (20-6).

T4 Wheel draws and plays Flowstone Channeler.

T5 Sengir draws and plays Tolarian Sentinel, activates Phyrexian Totem, attacks with Raptors, Totem and Nosferatu, Wheel blocks Nosferatu with Raptors, blocks Totem with Healer and Channeler, with combat damage on the stack, Wheel taps Healer to deal a point of damage to Nosferatu, Sengir responds by activates Nosferatu removing it from the game and replacing it with a 1/2 Bat token (20-2), Sengir sacrificing a Swamp, an Island and a Mountain for the three points of damage taken by the Phyrexian Totem.

T5 Wheel draws Spinneret Sliver, concedes

SENGIR WINS GAME ONE

 

T1 Wheel draws and plays Trespasser il-Vec.

T1 Sengir draws and plays Trespasser il-Vec.

T2 Wheel draws Castle Raptors, attacks with Trespasser blocked by Trespasser, plays Castle Raptors.

T2 Sengir draws Scryb Ranger.

T3 Wheel draws and plays Flowstone Channeler, attacks with Raptors (17-20), Sengir plays Scryb Ranger at end of Wheel’s turn.

T3 Sengir draws FOIL Island.

T4 Wheel draws Celestial Crusader, attacks with Raptors and Channeler, then after no blockers are declared Wheel plays Celestial Crusader as an instant (11-20).

T4 Sengir draws and plays Watchful Sliver.

T5 Wheel draws Bogardan Rager, attacks with Raptors, Channeler and Crusader, Raptors blocked by Scryb Ranger and Channeler blocked by Sliver, Wheel plays Bogardan Rager giving +4/+0 to Crusader (5-20).

T5 Sengir draws and plays Chromatic Star, activates Chromatic Star adding one black mana to his mana pool and drawing and playing Stormcloud Djinn.

T6 Wheel draws Wheel of Fate, attacks with Raptors and Crusader, Crusader blocked by Djinn (1-20).

T6 Sengir draws and plays Sengir Nosferatu, attacks with Djinn (1-17).

T7 Wheel draws Saltcrusted Steppe.

T7 Sengir draws and plays Phyrexian Totem.

T8 Wheel draws and plays Faceless Devourer.

T8 Sengir draws Castle Raptors, concedes

WHEEL WINS GAME TWO, MATCH TIED 1-1

 

GAME THREE

T1 Sengir draws Scryb Ranger.

T1 Wheel draws and plays Castle Raptors.

T2 Sengir draws and plays Glass Asp.

T2 Wheel draws and plays Flowstone Channeler, attacks with Raptors (17-20).

T3 Sengir draws and plays Flowstone Channeler, attacks with Glass Asp (17-18).

T3 Wheel draws Tolarian Sentinel, attacks with Raptors (14-18).

T4 Sengir draws Fire Whip, attacks with Glass Asp, Wheel activates Channeler discarding Tolarian Sentinel to give Asp +1/-1. When Asp goes to the graveyard, Wheel pays two mana to avoid losing two life to Asp’s triggered ability. Sengir plays Fire Whip on his Channeler.

T4 Wheel draws Spinneret Sliver, attacks with Raptors, Sengir plays Scryb Ranger as an instant, Wheel activates Channeler discarding Spinneret Sliver to give Scryb Ranger +1/-1 (before it can be declared as a blocker) (14-18), at end of turn, Sengir taps Channeler targeting Wheel (14-17).

T5 Sengir draws Traitor’s Clutch.

T5 Wheel draws D’Avenant Healer, attacks with Raptors and Channeler, Channeler blocked by Channeler, with combat damage on the stack, Sengir sacrifices Fire Whip targeting Wheel (11-16), Wheel plays D’Avenant Healer.

T6 Sengir draws and plays Tolarian Sentinel.

T6 Wheel draws and plays Sangrophage, attacks with Raptors (8-16).

T7 Sengir draws and plays Blazing Blade Askari.

T7 Wheel pays two life during upkeep (8-14) , draws Wheel of Fate, attacks with Sangrophage and Raptors, Raptors blocked by Sentinel, Sengir activates Sentinel discarding Traitor’s Clutch and returning Tolarian Sentinel to his hand (5-14).

T8 Sengir draws and plays Stormcloud Djinn, plays Tolarian Sentinel.

T8 Wheel pays two life during upkeep (5-12), draws Clockspinning, attacks with Raptors and Sangrophage, Sangrophage blocked by Sentinel and Askari, Raptors blocked by Djinn. Sengir activates Stormcloud Djinn twice (3-12) giving the Djinn +4/+0, Wheel taps Healer to prevent one damage to Sangrophage.

T9 Sengir draws  and plays Watcher Sliver.

T9 Wheel pays two life during upkeep (3-10), draws and plays Sol’kanar the Swamp King, attacks with Raptors blocked by Tolarian Sentinel and with Sangrophage blocked by Watcher Sliver, Wheel taps Healer to deal one damage to Sliver.

T10 Sengir draws  and plays Chromatic Star, activates and sacrifices Chromatic Star putting one black mana into his pool and drawing Trespasser il-Vec, concedes.

WHEEL WINS GAME THREE, WINS MATCH 2-1

 

SEMI-FINAL ROUND

 

Matches are now best two out of three games. Each “player” is aware of exactly what cards are in each pack, but not aware of what card their opponent has drawn until that card is revealed to them.

 

Mangara versus Wheel

GAME ONE

T1 Mangara draws Ghitu Firebreathing.

T1 Wheel draws Wheel of Fate.

T2 Mangara draws and plays Errant Doomsayers.

T2 Wheel draws and plays Chromatic Star, activates Chromatic Star putting a black mana into his mana pool and drawing and playing Faceless Devourer.

T3 Mangara draws Rift Bolt, attacks with Doomsayers, plays Ghitu Firebreathing enchanting Doomsayers, activates Firebreathing 80 times (20- -61)

MANGARA WINS GAME ONE

 

GAME TWO

T1 Wheel draws Saltcrusted Steppe.

T1 Mangara draws and plays Sage of Epityr, Mangara replaces the top four cards of his library in the following order: Penumbra Spider, Rift Bolt, Amrou Seekers, Ghitu Firebreathing.

T2 Wheel draws Bogardan Rager.

T2 Mangara draws Ghitu Firebreathing, attacks with Sage, plays Ghitu Firebreathing as an instant enchanting Sage, Wheel plays Bogardan Rager as an instant giving Rager +4/+0 until end of turn, Mangara activates Firebreathing 20 times giving Sage +20/+0 until end of turn, with combat damage on the stack, Mangara activates Firebreathing returning the enchantment back to Mangara’s hand.

T3 Wheel draws and plays Trespasser il-Vec.

T3 Mangara draws and plays Amrou Seekers.

T4 Wheel draws and plays Flowstone Channeler, attacks with Trespasser (17-20).

T4 Mangara draws Rift Bolt, attacks with Seekers, plays Ghitu Firebreathing as an instant enchanting Seekers, activates Firebreathing 48 times (17- -30)

MANGARA WINS GAME TWO, WINS MATCH 2-0

 

Stuffy versus Stonewood

 

GAME ONE

T1 Stuffy draws and plays Amrou Scout.

T1 Stonewood draws and plays Sangrophage.

T2 Stuffy draws Ophidian Eye.

T2 Stonewood pays two life during upkeep for Sangrophage (20-18), draws Clockwork Hydra, attacks with Sangrophage (17-18), plays Clockwork Hydra.

T3 Stuffy draws and plays Clockwork Hydra.

T3 Stonewood taps Sangrophage during his upkeep, draws Stonewood Invocation.

T4 Stuffy draws Soul Collector and plays it face down, Stonewood taps his Hydra to add a counter at the end of Stuffy’s turn.

T4 Stonewood taps Sangrophage during his upkeep, draws Mystical Teachings, Stuffy taps his Hydra to add a counter at the end of Stonewood’s turn.

T5 Stuffy draws Fledgling Mawcor and plays it face down, Stonewood taps his Hydra to add a counter at the end of Stuffy’s turn.

T5 Stonewood taps Sangrophage during his upkeep, draws and plays Conflagrate dealing 249 points of damage to Stuffy.

STONEWOOD WINS GAME ONE

 

GAME TWO

T1 Stuffy draws and plays Shadow Sliver.

T1 Stonewood draws and plays Children of Korlis.

T2 Stuffy draws Slipstream Serpent and plays it face down, attacks with Shadow Sliver (20-19)

T2 Stonewood draws and plays Sangrophage.

T3 Stuffy draws FOIL Forest, attacks with Shadow Sliver and face down creature, Stuffy morphs face down into Slipstream Serpent (20-12).

T3 Stonewood pays two life during upkeep for Sangrophage (20-10), draws and plays Witch Hunter.

T4 Stuffy draws Grapeshot, attacks with Serpent and Sliver, Serpent blocked by Sangrophage (20-9).

T4 Stonewood draws and plays Benalish Cavalry.

T5 Stuffy draws Soul Collector and plays it face down, attacks with Serpent and Sliver, Serpent blocked by Children of Korlis, Stonewood activates Witch Hunter bouncing Shadow Sliver to Stuffy’s hand. Stuffy plays Shadow Sliver, plays Grapeshot targeting Witch Hunter and putting two Storm copies targeting Benalish Cavalry.

T5 Stonewood draws and plays Clockwork Hydra.

T6 Stuffy draws and plays Clockwork Hydra, attacks with face down creature, Shadow Sliver and Serpent blocked by Clockwork Hydra, Stonewood’s Clockwork Hydra removes a counter dealing one damage to Shadow Sliver, Stuffy morphs face down creature into Soul Collector (20-6).

T6 Stonewood draws Coral Trickster and plays it face down.

T7 Stuffy draws Fledgling Mawcor and plays it face down, when Stuffy declares an attack, Stonewood morphs face down creature into Coral Trickster tapping Clockwork Hydra, Stuffy attacks with Soul Collector and Slipstream Serpent blocked by Coral Trickster (20-3).

T7 Stonewood draws Viashino Bladescout, concedes.

STUFFY WINS GAME TWO, TIES MATCH 1-1

 

GAME THREE

T1 Stonewood draws and plays Looter il-Kor.

T1 Stuffy draws Thrill of the Hunt.

T2 Stonewood draws Sangrophage, attacks with Looter (19-20) drawing Cavalry Master and discarding Sangrophage, plays Cavalry Master.

T2 Stuffy draws and plays Clockwork Hydra.

T3 Stonewood draws Feebleness, attacks with Looter (18-20) drawing Spinneret Sliver and discarding Feebleness, plays Spinneret Sliver.

T3 Stuffy draws and plays Shadow Sliver, attacks with Hydra, removing a counter and dealing a point of damage to Looter (18-17).

T4 Stonewood draws and plays Mystical Teachings searching for Stonewood Invocations, attacks with Cavalry Master and Sliver (13-17).

T4 Stuffy draws Soul Collector and puts it into play face down, attacks with Sliver (13-16).

T5 Stonewood draws and plays Children of Korlis, attacks with Cavalry Master and Spinneret Sliver (8-16), at end of turn, Stuffy taps Hydra to add a counter.

T5 Stuffy draws Ophidian Eye, attacks with face down creature, Shadow Sliver, plays Ophidian Eye on face down creature (8-13) drawing and playing Stuffy Doll targeting Stonewood.

T6 Stonewood draws Coral Trickster and puts it into play face down, attacks with Spinneret Sliver (6-13), at end of turn Stuffy taps Hydra to add a counter.

T6 Stuffy draws Slipstream Serpent and plays it face down, attacks with Clockwork Hydra, removing a counter from Hydra dealing one point of damage to Shadow Sliver, at end of turn, Stonewood morphs face down creature into Coral Trickster tapping Stuffy Doll.

T7 Stonewood draws Clockwork Hydra, attacks with Cavalry Master blocked by face down number two (Slipstream Serpent), with Spinneret Sliver blocked by face down number one (Soul Collector), Children of Korlis and Coral Trickster, Stonewood plays Stonewood Invocation targeting Coral Trickster (-1 -13)

STONEWOOD WINS GAME THREE, WINS MATCH 2-1

 

FINAL ROUND

 

The final round is a best of five games match.

 

Mangara versus Stonewood

GAME ONE

T1 Mangara draws and plays Amrou Seekers.

T1 Stonewood draws and plays Clockwork Hydra.

T2 Mangara draws Momentary Blink.

T2 Stonewood draws and plays Looter il-Kor.

T3 Mangara draws and plays Sage of Epityr, replacing the top four cards of his library in the following order: Mangara of Corondor, Rift Bolt, Knight of the Holy Nimbus, Skittering Monstrosity, at end of turn Stonewood taps Hydra to add a counter.

T3 Stonewood draws Mystical Teachings, attacks with Looter and Hydra, removes counter from Hydra deals one point of damage to Sage of Epityr (15-20) drawing Stonewood Invocations and discarding Mystical Teachings.

T4 Mangara draws and plays Skittering Monstrosity, attacks with Seekers (15-18).

T4 Stonewood draws Keldon Halberdier, attacks with Looter (14-18) drawing and discarding Benalish Cavalry, plays Keldon Halberdier.

T5 Mangara draws Knight of the Holy Nimbus, attacks with Monstrosity blocked by Halberdier, Stonewood plays Stonewood Invocation targeting Halberdier, Mangara plays Momentary Blink removing Monstrosity from play and then returning it to play, at the end of turn Stonewood taps Hydra to put a counter on it.

T5 Stonewood draws Cavalry Master, attacks with Looter (13-18) drawing and discarding Children of Korlis, plays Cavalry Master.

T6 Mangara draws and plays Rift Bolt targeting Looter il-Kor, attacks with Skittering Monstrosity blocked by Clockwork Hydra, Stonewood removes a counter from Hydra to deal one damage to Mangara (12-18), Stonewood taps Hydra to put a counter on it, Mangara plays Knight of the Holy Nimbus.

T6 Stonewood draws Viashino Bladescout, attacks with Halberdier and Cavalry Master, Seekers blocks Halberdier (9-18).

T7 Mangara draws and plays Mangara of Corondor.

T7 Stonewood draws Coral Trickster and plays it face down, attacks with Halberdier and Cavalry Master, Halberdier blocked by Knight of the Holy Nimbus, Stonewood taps two mana to make Knight UNABLE to regenerate (6-18).

T8 Mangara draws and plays Penumbra Spider, at end of turn Stonewood morphs face down creature into Coral Trickster tapping Penumbra Spider, Stonewood plays Viashino Bladescout as an instant giving first strike to Coral Trickster.

T8 Stonewood draws and plays Feebleness as an instant enchanting Mangara of Cordondor, Mangara responds by activating Mangara of Corondor removing both it and the Halberdier from the game. Stonewood attacks with Cavalry Master, Coral Trickster and Bladescout, Mangara plays Momentary Blink from the graveyard with flashback removing Penumbra Spider from the game and then returning it to play, Penumbra Spider blocks Bladescout (1-18).

T9 Mangara draws and plays Ghitu Firebreathing enchanting Penumbra Spider, attacks with Spider, activates Firebreathing fifty times giving Penumbra Spider +50/+0 until end of turn (1- -34) (Conflagrate was Stonewood’s next card!)

MANGARA WINS GAME ONE

 

GAME TWO

T1 Stonewood draws and plays Looter il-Kor.

T1 Mangara draws and plays Eron the Relentless, attacks with Eron (20-15).

T2 Stonewood draws Feebleness, attacks with Looter (19-15) drawing Keldon Halberdier and discarding Feebleness, plays Keldon Halberdier.

T2 Mangara draws and plays Firemaw Kavu dealing two points of damage to Halberdier, attacks with Eron (19-10).

T3 Stonewood draws Coral Trickster, attacks with Looter (18-10) drawing and discarding Sangrophage, plays Coral Trickster face down.

T3 Mangara does not pay Firemaw’s echo cost, when Firemaw goes to the graveyard, it deals four damage to Looter il-Kor, Mangara draws Rift Bolt, declares an attack, Stonewood responds by morphing his face down creature into Coral Trickster tapping Eron the Relentless.

T4 Stonewood draws and plays Clockwork Hydra.

T4 Mangara draws Mangara of Corondor, plays Rift Bolt targeting Trickster, attacks with Eron blocked by Hydra, Stonewood removes a counter from Clockwork Hydra targeting Mangara (17-10), Mangara regenerates Eron, plays Mangara of Corondor.

T5 Stonewood draws and plays Mystical Teachings searching out Stonewood Invocation.

T5 Mangara draws and plays Penumbra Spider, attacks with Eron (17-5).

T6 Stonewood draws and plays Children of Korlis, at end of turn, Mangara activates Mangara of Corondor to remove it and Children of Korlis from the game. Stonewood concedes.

MANGARA WINS GAME TWO, LEADS MATCH 2-0

 

GAME THREE

T1 Stonewood draws and plays Clockwork Hydra.

T1 Mangara draws and plays Knight of the Holy Nimbus.

T2 Stonewood draws Stonewood Invocation.

T2 Mangara draws Aether Web, at end of turn Stonewood taps Hydra to add a counter to it.

T3 Stonewood draws Feebleness.

T3 Mangara draws Momentary Blink, at end of turn Stonewood taps Hydra to add a counter to it.

T4 Stonewood draws and plays Conflagrate tapping 499 mana to deal 249 damage to Mangara (-229 -20)

STONEWOOD WINS GAME THREE, TRAILS MATCH 1-2

 

GAME FOUR

T1 Mangara draws and plays Skittering Monstrosity.

T1 Stonewood draws and plays Spinneret Sliver.

T2 Mangara draws Mangara of Corondor, attacks with Monstrosity (20-15).

T2 Stonewood draws and plays Benalish Cavalry, attacks with Spinneret Sliver (18-15).

T3 Mangara draws Penumbra Spider, attacks with Monstrosity (20-10).

T3 Stonewood draws and plays Children of Korlis, attacks with Spinneret Sliver and Benalish Cavalry (14-10).

T4 Mangara draws and plays Rift Bolt targeting Children of Korlis, attacks with Monstrosity (14-0) (Conflagrate third from top of Stonewood’s library)

MANGARA WINS GAME FOUR, WINS MATCH 3-1

 

Yes, I know this was one insane exercise, but I hope that you enjoyed it enough to THINK about checking out my ULTIMATE DC-10 CHAMPIONSHIP involving every set from Alpha to Time Spiral, an exercise I hope to fully conceive for your reading pleasure in that deadly quiet Magic week when Christmas happens. Don’t worry, you don’t have to get ME anything. Reading my stuff is your gift to me!

 

Jeff Zandi

Texas Guildmages

Level II DCI Judge

jeffzandi@hotmail.com

Zanman on Magic Online

 


 







 

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